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Author: Subject: Single post lifts.....discuss
gregs

posted on 8/10/15 at 08:50 PM Reply With Quote
Single post lifts.....discuss

I'd set my heart on getting a two post lift in the garage (thick reinforced slab + vaulted ceiling were part of the build), but I keep looking at the space it's going to take up in the garage...

I've seen the following single post this evening, and it doesn't distress me anything like the other single post lifts I've seen, and I can see it would let me do almost all jobs on the car that a two post would - what do you guys think?

Greg

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bi22le

posted on 8/10/15 at 09:12 PM Reply With Quote
With a max lifting weight of around 5 times the weight of a kit, I would have little worry with stability.





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theconrodkid

posted on 8/10/15 at 09:56 PM Reply With Quote
bloke in the garage next to mine had one,it never looked safe and did wobble around a bit,he put an LDV minibus on and it came crashing to the ground.....only had 6 or so inch rawlbolts in the floor tho so i assume they would be ok with long bolts and a nice thick slab underneath.





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mark chandler

posted on 8/10/15 at 10:34 PM Reply With Quote
When you have a lift you stick more than your kit car on it, my 30 years old two post zippo has big feet, the arms do not extend beyond these so it cannot topple and the little car and trailer live on it as I park my Tin top underneath.

I can also put my car on at an angle and access 3 wheels at once although the post is tight against the wall, useful for dropping axles where you need to get at both sides.

All these new cheap ones seem to have little or no feet, the floor must be designed to take the load or you could be in trouble.

Not sure I would be brave enough with that to even want to work under the car as it will wobble around as you pull and push with only one leg, however I have never used one so it may be fine.

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Smokin Donut

posted on 8/10/15 at 10:49 PM Reply With Quote
Good question. I'm in the same position and was having the same dilemma. The car is closer to the post than a conventional 2 post. Plus I may want to put my defender 110 on it. Would like to hear from someone who has used one.





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Barkalarr
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posted on 8/10/15 at 11:09 PM Reply With Quote
I too have been looking at these for my Caterham.
I'd be happy with a two post ramp but one of the posts would be slap bang in the middle of the garage. I think a 240v single post which also bolts to the wall would be absolutely perfect for what I would want. If it's mounted to the wall and the floor there should be no chance of it falling over. My roof is not very high so wouldn't really be able to take a tin top.

I can't justify a brand new one so if there is anyone out there who wants to sell me their single post ramp then I would be interested.

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MikeRJ

posted on 8/10/15 at 11:18 PM Reply With Quote
Looks like it could be a bit inconvenient for replacing an exhaust or taking a gearbox out on a RWD car.
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coyoteboy

posted on 9/10/15 at 12:52 AM Reply With Quote
Looks like the worst of all world to me, plus I'd hate to be under something that wasn't statically stable in its normal position and that thing could, should the anchor bolts fail, topple.





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gregs

posted on 9/10/15 at 04:21 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by MikeRJ
Looks like it could be a bit inconvenient for replacing an exhaust or taking a gearbox out on a RWD car.


Good shout..

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gregs

posted on 9/10/15 at 04:22 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Barkalarr
I too have been looking at these for my Caterham.
I'd be happy with a two post ramp but one of the posts would be slap bang in the middle of the garage. I think a 240v single post which also bolts to the wall would be absolutely perfect for what I would want. If it's mounted to the wall and the floor there should be no chance of it falling over. My roof is not very high so wouldn't really be able to take a tin top.

I can't justify a brand new one so if there is anyone out there who wants to sell me their single post ramp then I would be interested.


Exactly the same dilemma I'm working around.. Nice big garage feels small if there is a bloody great column in the middle of it

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gregs

posted on 9/10/15 at 04:28 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by coyoteboy
Looks like the worst of all world to me, plus I'd hate to be under something that wasn't statically stable in its normal position and that thing could, should the anchor bolts fail, topple.


Can't quite work the geometry of this - I think (maybe optimistically) that the floor runner runs out past the centre line of the vehicle.... Which would theoretically make it stable..... Assuming the L frame can't fold up on itself... :/

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HowardB

posted on 9/10/15 at 06:00 AM Reply With Quote
the mobile one at the bottom of the page must be intrinsically stable as there are no floor fixings, and whilst it says there are pads for 4x4 etc the arms must reach all the way across the body,... as a previous post said (excuse the pun) not so great for exhaust or gearbox work, and to be fair before I worked under that I would at least want some form prop at each end to make it feel safer.





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jeffw

posted on 9/10/15 at 07:24 AM Reply With Quote
There are scissor lifts on that site which might be a better bet.





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rdodger

posted on 9/10/15 at 08:12 AM Reply With Quote
I think I would be happier with this.

http://www.automotechservices.co.uk/products/as-7330-three-tonne-scissor-lift/

Fitted in the floor no posts at all.






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Rosco86

posted on 9/10/15 at 08:41 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by rdodger
I think I would be happier with this.

http://www.automotechservices.co.uk/products/as-7330-three-tonne-scissor-lift/

Fitted in the floor no posts at all.


thats sweet!





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coyoteboy

posted on 9/10/15 at 09:22 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by gregs
quote:
Originally posted by coyoteboy
Looks like the worst of all world to me, plus I'd hate to be under something that wasn't statically stable in its normal position and that thing could, should the anchor bolts fail, topple.


Can't quite work the geometry of this - I think (maybe optimistically) that the floor runner runs out past the centre line of the vehicle.... Which would theoretically make it stable..... Assuming the L frame can't fold up on itself... :/


Looking at the image the "feet" clearly don't extend past about 1/3 vehicle width. Most mass is at the centreline, meaning you want at LEAST 2/3 vehicle width foot length or the "heel" bolts on the legs are under tension as it tries to topple over its toes. Hence it's relying on the bolts to hold your car up. There's no way I'd put valuable china under it, let alone me, without full floor strength assessment and top quality hole prep and bonded fasteners.

At least two-posters are inherently stable as one post falling toward the other is reacted by the other, but even those are a bit dodgy with a heavy nosed car.





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mcerd1

posted on 9/10/15 at 12:44 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by coyoteboy
Looking at the image the "feet" clearly don't extend past about 1/3 vehicle width. Most mass is at the centreline, meaning you want at LEAST 2/3 vehicle width foot length or the "heel" bolts on the legs are under tension as it tries to topple over its toes. Hence it's relying on the bolts to hold your car up. There's no way I'd put valuable china under it, let alone me, without full floor strength assessment and top quality hole prep and bonded fasteners.

At least two-posters are inherently stable as one post falling toward the other is reacted by the other, but even those are a bit dodgy with a heavy nosed car.

^^ what he said - the more inherently stable it is the better and will help minimise risk relating to the foundation and anchor bolt strengths / capacities



your average rawl bolt or resin anchors strength is entirely dependant on the strength and condition of the concrete and on the way it has been installed - get any part of that wrong and it can go very badly wrong

I wouldn't even think about anchoring a ramp like that to anything other than sizable lump of good quality reinforced concrete that's been checked to ensure its strong enough and big enough to avoid it overturning, sinking, or moving so as to cause damage to adjacent foundations / floors.

and even then I'd be very suspicious of any 'drill and fit' anchor system without testing its strength after installation to at least 1.25x the actual design load it will need to carry in the worst possible case (i.e. a load several time that it will see every day)
Even the likes of Hilti, Rawl, Fosroc and all the other major makers of these systems will tell you they must be tested on site it ensure they are fit for purpose. (the construction fixing association gives guidance on testing them)



Ideally I'd want the same concrete but with the bolts 'cast-in' with the reinforcement - that way you can eliminate several big risks relating to bad installation of the anchors.
(you can get special square/square headed bolts and washers for this purpose in size M16 and up, just google "BS 7419 bolts"
and you can fabricate alternative one for smaller sizes from threaded rods if need be)


That might seem a bit OTT, but remember its not just your car that could be damaged if it failed

[Edited on 9/10/2015 by mcerd1]





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gregs

posted on 9/10/15 at 03:49 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by coyoteboy
quote:
Originally posted by gregs
quote:
Originally posted by coyoteboy
Looks like the worst of all world to me, plus I'd hate to be under something that wasn't statically stable in its normal position and that thing could, should the anchor bolts fail, topple.


Can't quite work the geometry of this - I think (maybe optimistically) that the floor runner runs out past the centre line of the vehicle.... Which would theoretically make it stable..... Assuming the L frame can't fold up on itself... :/


Looking at the image the "feet" clearly don't extend past about 1/3 vehicle width. Most mass is at the centreline, meaning you want at LEAST 2/3 vehicle width foot length or the "heel" bolts on the legs are under tension as it tries to topple over its toes. Hence it's relying on the bolts to hold your car up. There's no way I'd put valuable china under it, let alone me, without full floor strength assessment and top quality hole prep and bonded fasteners.

At least two-posters are inherently stable as one post falling toward the other is reacted by the other, but even those are a bit dodgy with a heavy nosed car.


On looking at it again you're absolutely right... I'd been looking at the grey bit but clearly that's linked to the arms and hence raises - doh.

So I totally agree - rubbish idea!!!

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