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Author: Subject: Air over hydraulic
907

posted on 6/9/18 at 06:33 AM Reply With Quote
Air over hydraulic

I'm in the process of buying a car lift and have found one that I like the look of, in my price range, and would fit in my
low roofed tandem garage.


Only thing is it's Air over Hydraulic, and to be honest I don't understand what that is ????



Anyone know how it works ?


TIA
Paul G





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cliftyhanger

posted on 6/9/18 at 07:21 AM Reply With Quote
https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/general-archive/air-over-hydraulic-87070/

Helpful? Sounds like maybe you use your compressor rather than an electric motor to pump the fluid?

I keep thinking about a scissor type lift. As I am getting a (bit) older having the car a metre off the ground appeals....are you looking at the CJ one?

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jollygreengiant

posted on 6/9/18 at 07:29 AM Reply With Quote
In it's simplest form, normal hydraulic brakes, but the hand brake is kept OFF by air pressure fed from a compressor into a reservoir tank. When the system is selected for Hand Brake off, then the air system pressurises and the hand brake stays off. IF you get a leak on the system, then the hand brake can/will come on. This system can be identified by pressure bellows on the rear axle operating rods into the rear drums (normally).

IHTH's

More complicated is replace vacuum circuit (servo) with a pressure cylinder system that operates onto the hydraulic thereby multiplying the pressure boost applied to the pedal.
JGG

[Edited on 6/9/18 by jollygreengiant]





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phil m

posted on 6/9/18 at 08:11 AM Reply With Quote
I have a Cascos two post lift in my garage. It has a hydraulic pump powered by electricity and uses a pneumatic air system to power the lift safety catches . These are powered by a small compressor and if this fails the safety pins go back into the way of the lift mechanism locking the lift from moving .

Hope this helps

Phil


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40inches

posted on 6/9/18 at 08:17 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by cliftyhanger
https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/general-archive/air-over-hydraulic-87070/

Helpful? Sounds like maybe you use your compressor rather than an electric motor to pump the fluid?

I keep thinking about a scissor type lift. As I am getting a (bit) older having the car a metre off the ground appeals....are you looking at the CJ one?

One of the best things in my garage. I got the adjustable width one, but for a 7 the 700mm width is spot on. I would buy the cheaper fixed width one and cut it down, given the time again.
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cliftyhanger

posted on 6/9/18 at 09:49 AM Reply With Quote
Thread drift....

I was thinking a proper 1m high scissor lift, but 1200-1400 and heeeaaaavy. 400kg.
I also thought about a tilter as work is often front or rear, sometimes both and rarely the middle. Costs are better too.
So does it work OK with a drill?? I have old Triumphs, and a bit unsure if it would work with a chassis that is bery narrow in the middle. Guess it would work under the sills (though many Triumphs have rather iffy sills, mine are good though!)

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rusty nuts

posted on 6/9/18 at 11:54 AM Reply With Quote
Contact the suppliers for a spec sheet, if they will not supply one they wouldn't get my business.
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907

posted on 6/9/18 at 04:35 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by rusty nuts
Contact the suppliers for a spec sheet, if they will not supply one they wouldn't get my business.





I have contacted 6 suppliers over the last few days.

2 have waffled about everything bar the question asked.

3 haven't bothered to answer.

1 I txt'd and had an answer back in 10 mins, (today) 3 more to answer questions, 1 more to give my address and agree to pay
lorry driver by card and it will be here between 9 and 11 in the morning. 1100 all in.


Paul G

I'll post a pic tomorrow





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cliftyhanger

posted on 6/9/18 at 04:52 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by 907


1 I txt'd and had an answer back in 10 mins, (today) 3 more to answer questions, 1 more to give my address and agree to pay
lorry driver by card and it will be here between 9 and 11 in the morning. 1100 all in.


Paul G

I'll post a pic tomorrow


Please do, and report on it. If any good I may well be interested in one!

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40inches

posted on 6/9/18 at 05:28 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by cliftyhanger
Thread drift....

I was thinking a proper 1m high scissor lift, but 1200-1400 and heeeaaaavy. 400kg.
I also thought about a tilter as work is often front or rear, sometimes both and rarely the middle. Costs are better too.
So does it work OK with a drill?? I have old Triumphs, and a bit unsure if it would work with a chassis that is bery narrow in the middle. Guess it would work under the sills (though many Triumphs have rather iffy sills, mine are good though!)


The SJ add mentions as being suitable for Triumphs. I looked at the hydraulic ones, but couldn't warrant spending 1200 on a hobby lift
I re bushed all the suspension in a day, the lift made it a doddle

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907

posted on 7/9/18 at 07:44 PM Reply With Quote
On the good side it arrived this morning at 9.05


On the bad side, no hydraulic oil included so ordered some from my local Motorcraft so now must wait till tomorrow lunchtime.



I had to smile. Offered the driver a cup of tea. He took the top off his flask, poured it in, said thanks and was gone in a flash





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907

posted on 11/9/18 at 08:48 AM Reply With Quote
So after a long inspection I felt that the hydraulics were not the safest part of the lift.

Would I want to be under there if the manual safety failed? I don't think so.


I decided to take it to the local hydraulic fitting supplier and he replaced all the metal fittings and the two hoses for 63.54

A small amount to pay for piece of mind. After a speaking to the supplier/importer he has reimbursed me this amount. Top marks.




It's first job is just as a bench as I have some mods on a chassis to do.

I'm pleased with it now it has the proper JIC fittings and CE marked hoses
Here's that pic I promised.

Paul G


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