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Author: Subject: If You Could Give Advice To Anyone Considering A Build, What Would It Be?
Big T

posted on 15/4/20 at 10:15 AM Reply With Quote
If You Could Give Advice To Anyone Considering A Build, What Would It Be?

Hello Chaps.

I realise that this isn't the correct section of the forum for this to be started. I am hoping to start this topic with a bundle of questions, hopefully some advice can be shared by those of you on here that are far more knowledgeable in the subject than myself. Hopefully this will then develop into a build thread, with a build and some notable progress and perhaps it will serve as some sort of help for any other potential candidates looking to start their own builds. I always like to look at build threads when I am considering a new project because its usually a well documented source of information, what fits, what doesn't, what works and what is a total waste of time.

Despite having a pretty low post count on this forum, I've been more of a watcher than a contributor, I have met a fair few members and they have always been very helpful, accommodating and have offered some sound advice and have always seemed very happy to talk about their own projects which I find very helpful.

Now to get to the point, I've wanted to build a "Seven Style" car for a number of years now. It all started with a build thread on here actually a fair few years ago. I then bought the Haynes roadster book, lent it to a friend and never saw it again. One thing and then another got in the way and it never happened. I started looking at cars last year and looked at a RH 2B which was not the best of ideas, it put me off considerably and I ended up buying another Porsche which I thoroughly enjoy, however once again I have found myself back here again.

I placed a wanted advert on this very forum for a project, I was hoping for something road registered to save me the bother of faffing around with SVA/IVA and the related costs, however registered vehicle prices clearly reflect the test costs, understandably so. I was then offered a non-registered project and I am incredibly interested in it and this brings me to the starting of this topic. Given the conditions in the country right now and the fact we can not travel no progress has been made regards this potential project and nothing will happen until it is lifted, which will probably be some considerable time yet. So some planning and research is on the cards.

So my questions are. Those of you who have built and registered your own cars. If you could give any new builder some advice what would it be? Is there anything you would do differently or perhaps change? Was the test procedure as complicated as you possibly first envisioned it being? Was there any advice you wish you had received when you first started out?

The car I am looking at is a Ford based, part built (no engine or box) GTS W7DE.


Any advice, help, even some photos of your own builds would be great.


Thanks.

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SJ

posted on 15/4/20 at 11:01 AM Reply With Quote
For me the trade off was between a quick build and getting the car you wanted first time out.

I opted for quick and simple as I knew changes were coming to the SVA, so I used as much as possible from the donor car and left off as many additional things as possible.

For me this worked as I passed SVA first time and then subsequently changed the engine, added a screen, then wiper, side screens, hood, modified suspension etc.

I think one of the big risks is underestimating build time and cost and as a result never finishing.

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big_wasa

posted on 15/4/20 at 11:06 AM Reply With Quote
The more you deviate from the plans if building from scratch the less likley you will finish.

Just little changes can have knock on affects down the line.

Nothing wrong with the Gts panther. If you whe lucky enough to get the parts you ordered they where generally good quality.

But. Darren did sell the plans so you could build your own. As I did. I then bought his fibre glass. So look at what you're buying. Obviously an invoice would be nice.

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Mr Whippy

posted on 15/4/20 at 11:07 AM Reply With Quote
Not to be flippant, but if you want to build a car then fine pick a good kit and go for it. It can be fun sometimes.

If want to drive it just save up/get a loan and buy one on the road. When all is done, building will probably actually end up costing more and it could be quite a while till you get to drive it.

In the current economic climate I'd be very wary of getting finance on any car but it does depend on your own circumstances of course.

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big_wasa

posted on 15/4/20 at 11:12 AM Reply With Quote
I get at least 75% of my enjoyment from having somthing in the garage to tinker with.

How big is big in Big T ?

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Big T

posted on 15/4/20 at 11:35 AM Reply With Quote
Thanks for all of the input. Hopefully this Multi quote works!

quote:
Originally posted by SJ
For me the trade off was between a quick build and getting the car you wanted first time out.

I opted for quick and simple as I knew changes were coming to the SVA, so I used as much as possible from the donor car and left off as many additional things as possible.

For me this worked as I passed SVA first time and then subsequently changed the engine, added a screen, then wiper, side screens, hood, modified suspension etc.

I think one of the big risks is underestimating build time and cost and as a result never finishing.


When did you register your car SJ and what changes did you successfully dodge?

I have zero experience with Seven Style cars, never even been in one, probably sounds crazy. So a basic Pinto or Zetec, the later being what I will be opting for, would be plenty initially. I will also be going for something with no screen and as you say, less components as the less there is, the less chance of a fail which is great.


Part of the initial lure for me was the fact the Haynes roadster was pushed as a "1500 sports car" however within the first few pages this goes square out of the window and it has taken me a fair bit of research to get a better idea of overall costs.


quote:
Originally posted by big_wasa
The more you deviate from the plans if building from scratch the less likley you will finish.

Just little changes can have knock on affects down the line.

Nothing wrong with the Gts panther. If you whe lucky enough to get the parts you ordered they where generally good quality.

But. Darren did sell the plans so you could build your own. As I did. I then bought his fibre glass. So look at what you're buying. Obviously an invoice would be nice.


I understand your point completely there Wasa. My intentions would be to get the car in a complete state as quickly and efficiently as possible by going down an already proven process. Ive always liked the idea of a B2-4 saab powered kit, however a Zetec option seems reliable with enough informative resources available online.

GTS was based just down the road from me in Canterbury, however are no longer trading. If issues of things not turning up was the case it isn't a mystery why.

quote:
Originally posted by Mr Whippy
Not to be flippant, but if you want to build a car then fine pick a good kit and go for it. It can be fun sometimes.

If want to drive it just save up/get a loan and buy one on the road. When all is done, building will probably actually end up costing more and it could be quite a while till you get to drive it.

In the current economic climate I'd be very wary of getting finance on any car but it does depend on your own circumstances of course.


I agree with you entirely. I have to say I have never financed anything (apart from when I bought my house) and I sure I don't intend to, not that there is anything wrong with it at all I just never have.

I have built a few cars over the last few years, mostly minis. I have converted and run a Nissan powered car, Vauxhall and rover. The build process is the most enjoyable part for me, if I bought a ready built car I would pull it all to pieces and put it all back together again anyway. I am currently rounding up in a 1967 MK2 Morris Cooper I've had for a few years.

I have read many remarks saying building costs more. However I think there would be a significant amount of satisfaction in building and registering something that came from your own garage.


quote:
Originally posted by big_wasa


I get at least 75% of my enjoyment from having somthing in the garage to tinker with.

How big is big in Big T ?


Relatively big but not huge. Dopped down to just over 100kg at 6ft. So far from a small chap. Part of the appeal with the GTS W7DE is that is made with the larger chap in mind. From what I understand.

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theduck

posted on 15/4/20 at 12:19 PM Reply With Quote
Take your time, know your limits, join a club and get to know local members.
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SJ

posted on 15/4/20 at 12:45 PM Reply With Quote
quote:

Thanks for all of the input. Hopefully this Multi quote works!

quote:
Originally posted by SJ
For me the trade off was between a quick build and getting the car you wanted first time out.

I opted for quick and simple as I knew changes were coming to the SVA, so I used as much as possible from the donor car and left off as many additional things as possible.

For me this worked as I passed SVA first time and then subsequently changed the engine, added a screen, then wiper, side screens, hood, modified suspension etc.

I think one of the big risks is underestimating build time and cost and as a result never finishing.


When did you register your car SJ and what changes did you successfully dodge?

I have zero experience with Seven Style cars, never even been in one, probably sounds crazy. So a basic Pinto or Zetec, the later being what I will be opting for, would be plenty initially. I will also be going for something with no screen and as you say, less components as the less there is, the less chance of a fail which is great.


Part of the initial lure for me was the fact the Haynes roadster was pushed as a "1500 sports car" however within the first few pages this goes square out of the window and it has taken me a fair bit of research to get a better idea of overall costs.




I built mine Nov '05 to Nov '06. I knew the SVA was to change though that didn't happen in the end until 09. The IVA is a bit more strict I believe but I didn't look into as I didn't need to. By building simple I avoided extra radii checks on the extra bits bolted on. By using the original engine I had an easy emissions check and no problems with noise (standard single carb is much quieter than 4 mikunis!). Standard brakes helped because there were no front / rear balance problems, standard clocks were correctly calibrated etc. It all adds up to lots of saved time.

[Edited on 15/4/20 by SJ]

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steve m

posted on 15/4/20 at 02:03 PM Reply With Quote
If I was to have my time again, and knew then what I knew now, I would by a complete kit, and something more
practical than a 7, and not go down the home built chassis etc as per the original book

Not saying I didn't enjoy the process, as I did, but as said above two steps forward and three back some days,
and some days even worse !!

7 are not practical in any way, they are not suited to a normal drive out, weather protection is expensive, and even homemade
as mine was, was ok,

If I was to build again, and I am not, I would go down the Cobra route, or Ferrari 250 repos style of cars

Just my personal view

steve





Thats was probably spelt wrong, or had some grammer, that the "grammer police have to have a moan at




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Mr Whippy

posted on 15/4/20 at 02:17 PM Reply With Quote
Yeah much as they make terrific track cars and the odd sunny blast they aren't much more practical than a motor bike. If I had the cash and the time for another kit car it would have a roof, doors and a boot! However in reality I'd just get a nice tin toptop to restore. Blasphemy on this site no doubt...
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SJ

posted on 15/4/20 at 02:22 PM Reply With Quote
quote:

If I had the cash and the time for another kit car it would have a roof, doors and a boot! However in reality I'd just get a nice tin toptop to restore. Blasphemy on this site no doubt...



Not in my book. Would have bought an Alfasud instead of the MK but couldn't fit it down the drive, whereas 7 went in no problem. My daughter won't let me swap now.

Still love the MK though

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jps

posted on 15/4/20 at 02:38 PM Reply With Quote
I think Mr Whippys point is a really good one. Think about what is important to you, to achieve, to do, to have. And reflect on what skills you have, vs what skills you want to develop. And how much you want to spend (or if this is even important to you). Work this through, and you'll hopefully set off in the right direction with your project.

I started this, 8 years (!) ago thinking I would like to have a 7 type car, and to have 'built it' myself. I thought it might take me maybe 3 years and cost a few grand. I wanted to learn about how a car worked in practice, how to work on it, and sucessfully build something from effectively 'nothing' off my own back. And do it all with some level of frugality. I had vague dreams of blatting through the country lanes once it was 'done', but they weren't really that important.

Reflecting on the above points I quickly (i.e. before really starting) went from "wanting" to build my own car from scratch, to *choosing* to buy a part-built/abandoned project, to avoid a lot of the main fabrication work. I realised how big a step it would be to go from having never welded, to producing chassis and suspension parts i'd be happy with.

My timescale has obviously stretched out a lot, life getting in the way, but also because I chose to stick to 'doing it myself' and keeping the costs own. In reality I am less bothered about having the finished car, more interested in making it - even if I make painfully slow progress on the many jobs that are to be done.

What I would reflect on is that i've spent a lot of time (which is not something I have a lot of) on grunt work - last weekend it was a couple of hours trying to cleanup the subframes for my seats, so I can finally paint them, one of many similar jobs i've gone through in the last few years: de-rusting/electrolysising parts/cleaning old paint off/prepping for new paint/etc/etc. This is the trade off I have to accept for low cost, but I probably didn't forsee the amount of dull legwork that goes into reconditioning parts/fabricating. Or the frustration when your best laid plans turn out to have not worked, and you have to start a job all over again...

As a final point i'd say: "If you have the time/space/money - follow your dream, and just be prepared to knuckle down at some point, whether that is with time or money". If you are lacking on any of those 3, think carefully about what you're embarking on before you commit!

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J666AYP

posted on 15/4/20 at 03:46 PM Reply With Quote
My tips for a new build are:

1. Take your budget and double it.
2. Stick a whiteboard on the garage wall and do a to do list.
3. Don't be afraid to ask questions on here, the collective knowledge is far greater than anywhere else kitcar related.
4. Google is your friend.
5. Outsourcing will make the build alot easier and probably faster.
6. Most importantly enjoy the build.

Oh and stay away from Mercedes donors, they are a world of hurt haha.

Jay

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harmchar

posted on 15/4/20 at 05:22 PM Reply With Quote
First question I'll ask is - do you have a decent garage/workshop full of tools. If not and you're building from scratch and doing all jobs yourself, you have to factor all the tools into the budget.
I bought an unfinished project that on first look was not far from being complete. But once in my garage and reading all the IVA faff, I am almost back to a bare chassis sorting things that would never pass. Electrics have been my bug bear but have learnt loads and almost enjoyed the experience. There is a sense of achievement if you find a problem then have to find and apply the solution yourself. (Or with help of the great minds on here)

[Edited on 15/4/20 by harmchar]

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Theshed

posted on 15/4/20 at 07:30 PM Reply With Quote
I wonder why on a website named after a scratch built car so many of the responses warn against the folly of the whole concept.

I am a fully paid up member of the 'it's better to travel than to arrive' club. I had worked as a mechanic but building my car led to improving my welding, machining, cnc machine building, composites, wires and stuff and so on.

The still unfinished project has cost me an eye watering sum. I do not regret a penny. One day it might make some noise and roll around a track. Quite possibly it will not. Along the way I have enjoyed ...most of it.

If you want to build a car just do it. Never answer the two most troublesome questions. (1) when will it be finished (2) how much did that part cost....Just do one bit at a time.

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ReMan

posted on 16/4/20 at 12:02 AM Reply With Quote
Yes much as above
If you want to build one, build one.
If you just want to drive, buy one, theres no shame in it and it will probably be cheaper
Know your limitations in time available including what you family will allow
Be 100% sure what you want before you start
Drive or at least passenger in one
Look and touch some (difficult at the moment)
Dont settle for the cheapest/oldest/heavy power options
Part built is OK, but may disappoint, depending on your own standards you may have to start from scratch but with holes you didnt want
The "test" is not to be feared, its just a test, work to the rules at the outset and it should be a formality
Keep the Porsche too

Good luck





www.plusnine.co.uk
∙،. ˘≈ﺣ

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JimSpencer

posted on 16/4/20 at 07:25 AM Reply With Quote
Hi

Slight variation on the above..

Take a bit of time to decide what you want to Use the car for once you've finished, sunny days out with the other half? - then a full on track spec 7 probably aint going to work

Take you time to find:-

A built IVA'd car that's roughly close to the specification you want to end up with, preferably a shabby example so you don't feel too bad when you do the next bit:-

Then totally dismantle it and re-build it as you want it - turn it back into a 'Kit' learn from the bits of the original build you don't like and re-fresh all the components etc as you go.

You can change the engine, box, colour etc - whatever you like, safe in the knowledge that with a bit of simple form filling it'll keep the 'officialdom' happy..

You'll end up experiencing the vast majority of the normal Build process, but you'll have learnt from the dismantling process so that makes the build easier to do.

You'll loose all the faffing about and significant cost of the IVA and you wont have the grief one would expect to get off the other half when stripping a donor car on the drive..

And - it'll be a HUGE amount cheaper to do overall.

HTH

[Edited on 16/4/20 by JimSpencer]

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ianhurley20

posted on 16/4/20 at 08:19 AM Reply With Quote
I've built a number of 'kit' cars. In the late 60's I rebuilt a Lotus 6, a couple of years later an Opus Hrf, followed by a Ginetta G15 (that was brilliant in that it went together with ease and everything was there!). Then a gap with mortgage, marriage and children. I kept looking though.
Then about 10 years ago decided to have a seriuos look (no mortgage, kids left home and still married). I looked at mainly sevens. Westfield - I would like but couldn't afford, GBS Zero - probably the best kit around but again I couldn't afford. After visiting several shows and sitting in different makes I found several I couldn't get in, 6' and 16 stone. can't fit in a Tiger which was another consideration either.
Oh dear.
I ended with a short list with the Robin Hood 2B+ at the top. So I built a Haynes Roadster. Very glad I did. Used an MX5 Mk 2 donor that cost 360 from which most of my parts came and the bits left over sold for 560! I kept cost low with ebay items and Renault Scenic rear seats (10) etc. Total car cost on the road was 3030.26 - almost a record I think :-)
I had it two years and really enjoyed it but got caught out in very heavy rain where the car aquaplaned and was written off. Since then have helped build a Tiger Avon with ST170 on tb's giving over 200bhp, am helping with a 1968 Ginetta G4 restoration and also another MX5 based Haynes Roadster.

So what would I build for myself next. Not Tiger! Westfield maybe but almost certainly the GBS Zero with almost any engine but ecoboost would be nice but more llikely anothe MX5 base.

Good luck with your task choosing





My build blog http://ianhaynes20.wordpress.com IVA passed 3/10/16
written off 23/9/18
Aug 2019 completed Tiger Avon with ST170 on TB's
Now restoring 1968 Ginetta G4
And - a series 1 Land Rover - don't ask why!

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big_wasa

posted on 16/4/20 at 10:02 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by big_wasa
I get at least 75% of my enjoyment from having somthing in the garage to tinker with.
How big is big in Big T ?


Relatively big but not huge. Dopped down to just over 100kg at 6ft. So far from a small chap. Part of the appeal with the GTS W7DE is that is made with the larger chap in mind. From what I understand.



Nah thats average

Re-modifications. You should be fine with a base kit fitting the Saab lump. But the cooling will take some head scratching.

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nick205

posted on 16/4/20 at 12:15 PM Reply With Quote
Make sure you have space available to work in and store the bits in.

Dismantling a donor car often gets messy and reconditioning the parts often costs more and takes longer than planned.

Locate a few car builders and owners local to you before you start. Knowing people always comes in helpful.

Personally I built an MK Indy back in the SVA (pre IVA) days. For me 75% of the enjoyment came from building kit. Don't get me wrong, the finished car was fantastic fun to have and drive, but the building (and tool buying) was just an absolute pleasure.

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Bluemoon

posted on 16/4/20 at 03:20 PM Reply With Quote
Read the IVA manual... build accordingly.. first time pass is cheaper!
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coyoteboy

posted on 16/4/20 at 04:34 PM Reply With Quote
JFDI. I'm still procrastinating 6 years later.





Report your local potholes, it actually works!

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coyoteboy

posted on 16/4/20 at 04:42 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Theshed
I am a fully paid up member of the 'it's better to travel than to arrive' club.


I mean if I travel, even if I enjoy the travelling, I still want to arrive!





Report your local potholes, it actually works!

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PorkChop

posted on 16/4/20 at 05:53 PM Reply With Quote
Go out in one before you spend significant amounts of time, energy and money on something you might not actually want.

I started off wanting one, found I couldn't physically drive some kits that well, if at all (I'm a similar build to you, size 12/13 feet). I looked at the Roadster, went out in BECs and CECs and started building a MX5 based one.

As I was building, I realised I wanted a RWD sports car now. So I went and found a very good, low mileage mk3 MX5 as a daily.

Long story short, the Roadster was sold unfinished. The MX5 is still on my drive with nearly 100k on the clock (although no longer my daily) and I have no plans to sell it. I realised the MX5 delivered what I wanted from the Roadster in a more accessible, easier to attain and cheaper way and I've still had a lot of fun with it.

[Edited on 17/4/20 by PorkChop]

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Big T

posted on 17/4/20 at 07:28 PM Reply With Quote
The quantity and quality of replies and information that has inundated this topic has really astounded me. I did expect to get anywhere near as much helpful input, so thank you all very much. I tried to quote everyone, but I ended up with a reply about 4 pages long, so I will try and go through and reply to you all.

Here we go.

theduck - Thanks for the suggestion, I suppose that FaceBook is probably the best place to find clubs, unfortunately I don't use facebook. Can anyone suggest any clubs in the South East or London?


SJ- Simple will also be my approach, the less items there are, the less there is to fail on. Modifications after the test date seems to be the preffered approach by most and is something I would consider.

steve m - Interesting to hear your points there Steve. I would love a AC Cobra, GT40, Mirage, Ultima or something like that, however my experience in kit building is non-existant. Perhaps in the future things may be different and hopefully I can gain some experience of kit building and the inspection process which I could utilise later down the line. My old neighbour many years ago had a mirage kit, I remember it in his garage when me and his son used to ride our PW90s. I am actually still in contact with that particular neighbour who now works at Santa Pod. Thorough petrol head and sound chap who I am sure would be happy to offer help and insight.

Mr Whippy - Thanks for your input again. I think I am fortunate enough to have had a pretty broad experience with tin tops. I've always had a "toy" on the side and have even utilised some as Daily vehicles. I have gone through the Jap phase with a GTR in the R32 flavour, GTiR pulsar, Imprezas and numerous other vehicles, R32 Golf, a few Porsches, Newer JCW minis and other various tin tops. I've also always had classic minis and I have reached a point where I am a bit sick of welding up rotten bits of car which seem to be never ending. I much prefer to be driving the thing than cutting and welding. That said My 60's mini cooper will never be sold and would, hopefully be run along side a Seven.

jps - Thanks for the very informative reply, you've clearly put a lot of effort into compiling your reply. It is interesting to see you also bought a part built project. I was keen to build my own chassis initially and I did a lot of research into the matter a number of years ago, however getting on the property ladder and other more pressing matters got in the way and this never happened. I was a stainless steel fabricator for a number of years before moving into a production engineer position within the same firm. Even with that relevant experience the appeal of building my own frame currently isn't that appealing, despite having welded one up for a friend who has plonked a V8 in it. Having undergone other various recommissions I am aware of the very boring process of degreasing, cleaning, painting and other time consuming jobs which offer no rear reward but need to be done. Your advice is great, I do have the space, the time is there as are the funds (don't get me wrong I wont for out for the whole lot in one go, it will be as and when they are needed). Is your build now complete?

J666AYP - Thanks for the input, I have followed your build thread with interest and fair play for having a go at something I have not yet seen before. How is the build progressing? I am very lucky with my employment, and my very good friend owns and runs a very successful machining shop which comes in very handy.

harmchar - Luckily enough I do have an excellent work space with a very comprehensive selection of tools which have been compiled over the years. In addition I have some good friends who are happy to loan tools between us. It is interesting to see that you stripped your whole project back and this is not the first time I have heard of this happening. I suppose in a way, for the sake of sanity it may be good practice to disassemble and then reassemble, to correct torque settings. Never "assume" anything. Is your car now registered and on the road?

Theshed - It is interesting that there is a reoccurring theme of feedback, of which I have taken notice. IS that your build as your profile picture? It certainly looks interesting. Do you have a build thread for it? I would be interested in having a look.

ReMan - Thanks for the reply. I think I have looked at photos of your build previously. In regards to driving one I have been looking and I see that Caterham do a hire system. Hire one for a day or two and they are just up the road from me. Funnily enough my uncle used to work for them a number of years ago. However the current situation like you say means nothing can happen any time soon. I suppose some of the cheaper options that were available are not overly cheap anymore. Pintos for example seem to have climbed in price recently. The Porsche will almost certainly be staying, if I can get away with it!

JimSpencer - Thanks for your thoughts there Jim. I have to say my initial plan was to buy an already tested car. I have been looking for a number of years and there seems to be so many different types of kit out there, built to so many different standards that I have never found anything that really ticks my boxes. Hence the reason I am now looking at picking up a part built kit. The componentry is what I would have chosen myself, in a style I would have gone for, yet the engine and box are not there so that gives me the freedom of choice which is desirable. I actually live only a few miles from the DVLA test centre. So although the test costs can not be avoided, transport costs to and from will be significantly reduced.

ianhurley20 - Interesting you say about fitting in things. My interest in this specific kit is due to the fact it is a larger model and should hopefully cater for my ample frame. I met a member on here that was local to me who had bought a GBS Zero and the kit was of an impressive standard. The RH 2B I looked at last year for the money I felt it was not financially viable. The amount of work required to get it to a standard I would have deemed acceptable would have probably cost the same as building a car from scratch. I have a work colleague who built a Locost many years ago, he used a sub 500 mk2 Escort 2 door donor which just goes to show how long ago it was built. he is built like a well established Oak tree and built the car to suit his size. He had it for a good few years before selling it to a chap in Italy.

big_wasa - Thank you! My biggest area of concern would be the gearbox. The most suitable boxes seem to be the R28 Omega box. It bolts straight up and is capable of handling up to around 300bhp which I am sure is plenty. Earlier I was reading through the GTS subforum and saw a foreign (possibly Sweden, or maybe Belgium) built GTS with a B204 motor. Dry sumped and running around 420bhp I think it was. Was running a dry sump though which I suspect is to get the engine sat a bit lower in the car, they seem to be a rather tall engine.


nick205 - I like to try and keep a well organised garage with suitable racking and some vague sense of order. I under stand what you mean about dismantling donor vehicles. For a few years I used to buy and dismantle vehicles along side my day job as an extra source of income and am all to familiar with how chaotic it can become. Its not something I would like to return to. Do you have any photos of your MK?

Bluemoon - Are we reffering to an official manual here? Its something i would undoubtedly need.

PorkChop - Thanks for the input Pork Chop. I have had a few MX-5s and have enjoyed them very much. ON another forum a Super car collecter was recently advised if buying an Aston Martin or Ferrari 430 was a good move and he was converned about having so much money tied up in such exotica. The supercar collector said something to the effect that he has had just as much fun in a 5000 Mx5 as he has in many of his Ferraris, with out the worry of having so much money tied up in a car. Commended it for its sheer fun and driveability which is interesting to hear. As much as i have enjoyed the cars in the past, and the rocketer V6 conversions look awesome fun, i think the main appeal about a kit for me is the self build aspect and it is the main draw. Unfortunatley i can not buy a car and just "leave it alone".


Once again thank you all very much for all of the help and advise you have offered. Any more please keep it coming!

[Edited on 17/4/20 by Big T]

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