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Author: Subject: Warning when welding please read this
jacko

posted on 30/3/17 at 05:41 PM Reply With Quote
Warning when welding please read this

http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=312386

Some may know about this some may not
I have been welding for about 45 to 50 years and i cant think i have ever read or herd about this
jacko

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loggyboy

posted on 30/3/17 at 05:44 PM Reply With Quote
Sounds nasty - However most of the brake cleaners i've used have evaporated in seconds, do they leave something behind or was this guy just using copious amounts with no gap before welding?






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Slimy38

posted on 30/3/17 at 06:06 PM Reply With Quote
I don't think I've ever heard about this either, and I saw all sorts of 'danger' posts about welding.

Having said that, I get the best weld from mechanically cleaned metal, a rough angle ground surface seems to work best. I even try and 'key' clean metal, it might just be wishful thinking but it does seem to help.

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r1_pete

posted on 30/3/17 at 06:12 PM Reply With Quote
Must admit I mechanically clean, have never considered using solvents, to me clean metal means bright / abraded.

Other than exotics like titanium, does it actually do any good? From that warning it adds too much risk by the sound of it.

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jtskips

posted on 30/3/17 at 06:36 PM Reply With Quote
strangely its great stuff for starting diesels

[Edited on 31/3/17 by jtskips]

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gremlin1234

posted on 30/3/17 at 06:54 PM Reply With Quote
I have seen these warnings before, and yes you should be concerned,
but the usual problem is where parts have been sprayed clean, and puddles of the stuff accumulate in dips in exhaust manifolds and such like.

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jacko

posted on 30/3/17 at 06:59 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by r1_pete
Must admit I mechanically clean, have never considered using solvents, to me clean metal means bright / abraded.

Other than exotics like titanium, does it actually do any good? From that warning it adds too much risk by the sound of it.



How do you clean box section when it comes covered in greasy /oil from the stockist

We use cellulose thinners but are we doing right ?

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Bluemoon

posted on 30/3/17 at 07:35 PM Reply With Quote
I think it might be the Trichloroethane that's the problem, I had thought this was band in the EU now (used to be used for dry-cleaning??...) it's also a carcinogen...

[Edited on 30/3/17 by Bluemoon]

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MikeRJ

posted on 30/3/17 at 07:49 PM Reply With Quote
This is only a problem with chlorinated brake cleaners e.g. ones that include Trichloroethane. You can buy brake cleaners that aren't chlorinated, but obviously there is a still a fire risk.
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DJT

posted on 31/3/17 at 02:27 PM Reply With Quote
Think I saw brake cleaner igniting from welding on YouTube recently. Roadkill perhaps?





http://tigeravonbuilddiary.blogspot.com/

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