Printable Version | Subscribe | Add to Favourites
New Topic New Poll New Reply
Author: Subject: Building wooden worskhop
davidimurray

posted on 16/8/17 at 02:22 PM Reply With Quote
Building wooden worskhop

Just moved into a new house, only downside is that the garage is probably the smallest I have had in years. Everything fits, just, but can't really get around the mill and lathe to use them. However one of the conditions with the boss was that I could build a workshop in the garden for my machine tools, model engineering projects etc and use the garage for car projects (and maybe another motorbike ....)

I know you lot have got plenty of good ideas so I thought I would run my ideas past you lot and see what thoughts' and advice you all had.

Shed will be roughly 15foot x 7 foot. Will have double doors at one end of the long face (for getting machines in and out, one normally closed other used for normal access). Probably no windows for security. Pricing up shed it looks like I would need 2kish for what I want so looking at building my own.

Concrete base 4-6" thick. Ontop of that a wooden floor that I can fill with insulation to keep the floor warm. Is this a good idea or will it encourage damp? Also would like the shed as close to floor level as possible to help get things in/out - again will I suffer with water?

Machine are not that big - probably 1/4t max so looking at lots of cross bracing and probably double stacked OSB on the floor.

Shed itself then - pent roof, inside insulated, boarded with 12mm OSB and roof also insulated and boarded (spent too long in freezing workshops!) What sizes would people advise for timber and spacing of the studs and roof joists. Shiplap cladding around the outside, probably wrapped in membrane before fitting.

How does that lot sound - any tips or advice on construction greatly received.

Cheers

Dave





Gallery 1 http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.116893465324.130778.601005324
Gallery 2 http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.245243755324.181913.601005324&l=a9831a9319
Gallery 3 http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.440671625324.232627.601005324&l=3f0d42c523
Gallery 4 http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.490098255324.297598.601005324&l=efb083b7df
Gallery 5 http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10150244028550325.366987.601005324&l=583fd5cd3a
Gallery 6 http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10150550640070325.430417.601005324&type=3&l=fe779b358c
Duratec Engine Swap https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10152527759580325.1073741828.601005324&type=1&l=40aae5e72f " target="_blank"> https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10152527759580325.1073741828.601005324&type=1&l=40aae5e72f

View User's Profile View All Posts By User U2U Member
Doctor Derek Doctors

posted on 16/8/17 at 03:01 PM Reply With Quote
I have an 18x8ft wooden workshop that i bought 4 years ago. Very similar tothe layout ypu are suggesting.

The company i bought it from said that gravel was a better base than concrete as water drains away quicker rather than flowing under and doesnt get trapped there so the floor wont be damp or rot.

I would be tempted to hunt around a bit more for pre-made ones, mine was a little over 2k as it was a custom size, i remember though at the time a standard 14x7 was only about 1200.

Mine has lasted really well and is betterthan i expected.





Designer and Supplier of the T89 Designs - Single Seater Locost. Build you own Single Seater Racecar for ~5k.
Plans and Drawings available, U2U or e-mail for details.

http://www.t89.co.uk/single-seater-locost.html



Supplier of pin kits for Alloy Uprights, Caterham Wingstay mounts and Ball Joint to Rose Joint steering conversion kits.

www.t89.co.uk
callan@t89.co.uk

NOTE:This user is registered as a LocostBuilders trader and may offer commercial services to other users
View User's Profile Visit User's Homepage View All Posts By User U2U Member
Bluemoon

posted on 16/8/17 at 03:15 PM Reply With Quote
Might be worth looking at logcabin type i.e: Keops interlock?
View User's Profile View All Posts By User U2U Member
David Jenkins

posted on 16/8/17 at 03:30 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Doctor Derek Doctors
The company i bought it from said that gravel was a better base than concrete as water drains away quicker rather than flowing under and doesnt get trapped there so the floor wont be damp or rot.



If the lathe and mill are fairly hefty then a good concrete floor is probably a requirement. A properly laid base with a moisture barrier should stop all damp, but you'd probably need a few layers of brick above ground level to make that work. Without the moisture barrier then you will probably suffer with damp eventually. If they're just 'amateur grade' then a good wooden floor may well be enough - but it will have to be strong!

You will probably want good insulation and low-level heating to stop your machinery rusting in the damp winters.





The older I get, the better I was...

View User's Profile Visit User's Homepage View All Posts By User U2U Member
Doctor Derek Doctors

posted on 16/8/17 at 03:37 PM Reply With Quote
I had a Myford Lathe in mine, the floor didnt break and it didnt go rusty. I have nver had any problem with damp at all.





Designer and Supplier of the T89 Designs - Single Seater Locost. Build you own Single Seater Racecar for ~5k.
Plans and Drawings available, U2U or e-mail for details.

http://www.t89.co.uk/single-seater-locost.html



Supplier of pin kits for Alloy Uprights, Caterham Wingstay mounts and Ball Joint to Rose Joint steering conversion kits.

www.t89.co.uk
callan@t89.co.uk

NOTE:This user is registered as a LocostBuilders trader and may offer commercial services to other users
View User's Profile Visit User's Homepage View All Posts By User U2U Member
TimC

posted on 16/8/17 at 03:47 PM Reply With Quote
If you decide not to do it yourself, I would recommend Mark at http://www.hensretreat.com - he's based in South/Mid Wales too.






View User's Profile View All Posts By User U2U Member
David Jenkins

posted on 16/8/17 at 04:18 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Doctor Derek Doctors
I had a Myford Lathe in mine, the floor didnt break and it didnt go rusty. I have nver had any problem with damp at all.


That's what I meant by 'hefty' v. 'amateur grade'! A Myford and stand will be fine on a decent shed base, but my Colchester Student would go straight through it. Similar for a Myford mill versus a Bridgeport. Years ago my brother had a Myford lathe in one of his bedrooms!

As for damp - I have a good-quality shed, but some of the garden tools show signs of rust unless I keep an eye on them. A plastic cover on the lathe with a low-wattage light bulb underneath is a simple solution to condensation problems, and insulation on the walls also helps.





The older I get, the better I was...

View User's Profile Visit User's Homepage View All Posts By User U2U Member
davidimurray

posted on 16/8/17 at 08:22 PM Reply With Quote
Thanks everyone for the input. The machines at not big currently - Denford starturn lathe and Triac Mill. Triac is the heaviest at about 1/4t- heavy enough to need the engine crane to lift it onto it's stand. Hopefully a Myford 7 will follow. I am limited by the width of the passage down the house .... although could always HIAB something bigger straight over the fence into the shed
Really I am looking for something warm and cosy that will keep the machines and equipment in there nice and dry.





Gallery 1 http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.116893465324.130778.601005324
Gallery 2 http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.245243755324.181913.601005324&l=a9831a9319
Gallery 3 http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.440671625324.232627.601005324&l=3f0d42c523
Gallery 4 http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.490098255324.297598.601005324&l=efb083b7df
Gallery 5 http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10150244028550325.366987.601005324&l=583fd5cd3a
Gallery 6 http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10150550640070325.430417.601005324&type=3&l=fe779b358c
Duratec Engine Swap https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10152527759580325.1073741828.601005324&type=1&l=40aae5e72f " target="_blank"> https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10152527759580325.1073741828.601005324&type=1&l=40aae5e72f

View User's Profile View All Posts By User U2U Member
SJ

posted on 17/8/17 at 07:16 AM Reply With Quote
I've both bought and built one. The one I built is miles better and for the same money much higher spec, particularly the roof which was crap on the one I bought and needed coraline to make it right. For the frame I used 38mmx89mm timber from Selco and bought 19mm t&g from ebay, cut to the right length. I tiled the roof with Redland 39s.

Mine is on a thin concrete base, but nothing heavy will be going in it.

View User's Profile View All Posts By User U2U Member
v8kid

posted on 17/8/17 at 12:02 PM Reply With Quote
Another consideration is heating. I used under floor heating with plastic pipes cast into the concrete floor and linked to the house oil boiler.

Totally condensation free and the concrete slab acts as a giant storage heater maintaining a constant temp (about 16C but it depends on how closely spaced the pipes are). It costs more to build as you have to incorporate solid slab insulation and DPC's in the floor slab but the pipes are standard plastic barrier piping coils from Toolstation. No problems supporting my Colchester.

On the wood structure I'd build a dwarf wall to sit the wooden frame on incorporating a DPC. That way you are above water splashes from the ground when it rains.

All above will take more time and probably another 500. but you pays your money and takes your choice

Cheers!





You'd be surprised how quickly the sales people at B&Q try and assist you after ignoring you for the past 15 minutes when you try and start a chainsaw

View User's Profile E-Mail User Visit User's Homepage View All Posts By User U2U Member   v8kid 's Aim
gremlin1234

posted on 17/8/17 at 12:18 PM Reply With Quote
whilst your at the planning stage, its worth considering fitting a sink/basin
View User's Profile View All Posts By User U2U Member

New Topic New Poll New Reply


go to top






Website design and SEO by Studio Montage

All content 2001-16 LocostBuilders. Reproduction prohibited
Opinions expressed in public posts are those of the author and do not necessarily represent
the views of other users or any member of the LocostBuilders team.
Running XMB 1.8 Partagium [ 2002 XMB Group] on Apache under CentOS Linux
Founded, built and operated by ChrisW.