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Author: Subject: Wood burner installation
NigeEss

posted on 27/10/10 at 11:05 AM Reply With Quote
Wood burner installation

Looking to sack the crap coal effect gas fire and fit a wood burner.
How much room do they need around them ?
Looked for info but can't find this bit.





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T66

posted on 27/10/10 at 11:41 AM Reply With Quote
Quick search...

http://www.firesonline.co.uk/acatalog/Stove-Building-Regulations.html


Did my install myself, with the help of a brickie.


Opened out the fireplace itself as it was not too wide, new concrete lintel. Bought an 8x6 sheet of fireproof board (sorry mate we dont cut it), used a 3x1 section of it across the lintel top.

And cemented it in.

Brickie laid the hearth and fettled the fireplace sides. Chimney breast was plastered to finish.


Swept chimney.

Sat fire on hearth.


Fitted 3' flu pipe & 90 elbow.


Cement it in flu pipe, and board from below too.


Light fire to cure the cement.


Stinks first time , my fire has lots of draw, so when you light it , pulls really hard.

I fitted a wire mesh birdcage

Sweep chimney in the summer when your not using it.


This year I pulled mine completely out, and removed the flu pipe and thoroughly cleaned behind it. Then applied fresh cement to the board. Its been in three years so was due a good clean out, never had any problems with it at any point.


When I eventually move house in the New Year, woodburner comes out and with me.





"One day I will grow up, But only for the day"

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David Jenkins

posted on 27/10/10 at 11:43 AM Reply With Quote
Had one fitted in the summer - the answer is "quite a lot".

Try this site - Stoves Online - they've got quite a lot of technical info there.

Also, if you look at the manufacturer's site, they often show the 'space around' technical details.

There's also a big fat building regs document that discusses chimney design, materials allowed near to the stove, and so on.

And don't forget that you'll probably need to line the chimney, if it isn't already.





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coozer

posted on 27/10/10 at 12:44 PM Reply With Quote
Had mine done over the summer, much the same as T66 there, although to satisfy building regs it installed by a HETAS engineer who managed the forms and registered the thing with building control.

I did all the building work myself, only getting the installing to actually put the burner in. Went for a liner as well as its more efficient than an open chimney.

Theres all sorts of rules for clearance (which come with the fire) and non combustible materials so I just opened the fire place up to its max and went with that.







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karlak

posted on 27/10/10 at 01:07 PM Reply With Quote
Should be checked after (if not istalled by) a HETAS engineer. They then fill out a plate which is placed next to the consumer unit in the house.

I was told this a legal requirement and if not done, could invalidate your household insurance in the event of a problem.





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T66

posted on 27/10/10 at 01:47 PM Reply With Quote
Stainless liners tend to get used when the chimney has become porous, and smells emit through the brick of the chimney breast.


My stove is very efficient without it.


The limitations of doing it yourself are fairly obvious, it will need hetas checking if you move on.


Otherwise what problems are you likely to encounter ...


I would suggest as routine you fit household carbon monoxide alarms.


But Ive had them and fire alarms wherever Ive lived anyway.


So like all things there are several ways to do it, Its probably better to go the route of diy, and follow it up with a hetas inspection.

As for the liner I would take advice from someone who knows, as I did and was was advised not to..





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Wheels244

posted on 27/10/10 at 08:55 PM Reply With Quote
It only needs Building Control approval, which can be satisfied by having it installed\signed off by Hetas Engineer if it's over 5kw.
My orginal Hunter wasn't over 5kw so I installed it myself( with father in law who is a builder).
I then upgraded to a 20Kw Aarrow Stratford SEB20(with boiler) and thermal store - all installed by Hetas Engineers.
Works great and heats the radiators and hot water.
Word of caution for my model - I just had to replace the glass and it cost 125.00 !! just because it's curved.

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NigeEss

posted on 27/10/10 at 10:11 PM Reply With Quote
5kw is the max I'd get anyway.
From what I've learned they are more efficient/cleaner run at full capacity so 5kw is ample.
That said, for peace of mind an inspection wouldn't be a bad thing.

[Edited on 27/10/10 by NigeEss]





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mad4x4

posted on 28/10/10 at 06:13 AM Reply With Quote
You need 12 " minimum between the front of the stove and edge of the builders "harth". As for distance round it the stove you need 6" (all minimum)





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David Jenkins

posted on 28/10/10 at 07:06 AM Reply With Quote
Building regs require an air vent near the stove for anything over 5kW, but for anything less natural ventilation is fine - so 5kW or smaller stoves are very popular!

Our stove is 5kW - more than adequate for our living room, and we often open the door to the hall to spread warm air through the house. So far this year we haven't used the central heating in the evenings.

As for the chimney liner - just about everything you read recommends it! This is done to reduce the diameter of the flue, which increases gas velocity, as the efficiency of the stove reduces the energy of the 'exhaust' considerably. This leads to condensation of tars in the unlined chimney, which in turn can lead to (a) a risk of dirty brown patches on upstairs walls that are all but impossible to remove, and (b) increased risk of fire. I didn't have to make that decision though - I had to have twin-wall flue pipe installed, as the house didn't have a chimney - I think that I would have done it anyway, as cleaning the chimney is much easier with a liner.

When it comes down to it - installing a stove isn't that difficult, if you have reasonable builder skills and can match the building regs. The big downsides of not getting it properly installed (or checked by the building inspectors) is the insurance company disowning a fire-damage claim if it's not approved, and also problems when trying to sell the house without an official approvals plate screwed to the wall somewhere.

[Edited on 28/10/10 by David Jenkins]





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