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Author: Subject: Any Astronomers here?
coozer

posted on 7/12/13 at 07:32 PM Reply With Quote
Any Astronomers here?

I fancy having a look at the skys to see whats up there, its amazing the effect small children and their curiosity have on you...

So, just wondering what I would need, and, what you can see?

Can you see the space station and the moon landing bits clearly? Is it possible to see satellites in orbit?

Also would fancy capturing images?

Whats the best way to get a small (and big) child interested?

Cheers,
Steve





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gremlin1234

posted on 7/12/13 at 07:56 PM Reply With Quote
lidl have telescopes this week
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HowardB

posted on 7/12/13 at 08:11 PM Reply With Quote
best thing is to start with a dark sky and wait until you can see the Milky Way, that is awe inspiring naked eye stuff. After that binoculars on a stand,.. that will give good detail of near objects. Also a digital camera just pointed up at the sky will show a lot of detail if you have a dark sky.

Challenge these days is finding the dark sky.

For identifying things the google sky map app is good,..

hth





Howard

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Sloan85

posted on 7/12/13 at 08:36 PM Reply With Quote
Some satellites can be seen with the naked eye, so can the ISS. They move quite quickly through the sky. Apparently you can make out the shape of the ISS. With binoculars but I haven't tried it. With the named eye they both look like faint stars that move

A couple of years ago I started looking at iridium flares. These are reflections from iridium communication satellites that move across the sky and get very bright before disappearing again.

The website http://www.heavens-above.com has predictions for paths of these flares, satellites and where the ISS will be visible.





http://mkindygsxr.blogspot.co.uk

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austin man

posted on 7/12/13 at 09:26 PM Reply With Quote
you can download an app onto your phone that will show you what is situated where based on your location, basicall point the phone skyward and it will identify positions of all major star constelations and planets





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Cheffy

posted on 7/12/13 at 09:30 PM Reply With Quote
Once you've seen the ISS go by once you'll find yourself checking the Heavens-above website for it regularly. It doesn't matter how many times you see it, it's still fascinating.

The other thing I find fascinating is the Andromeda Galaxy - the next nearest to our own. You're supposed to be able to see it with the naked eye but I can't. But then I don't have the best eye sight in the world! I can see it with binoculars though. There are plenty of websites to tell you how to find it.

Mart.

[Edited on 7/12/13 by Cheffy]





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Sloan85

posted on 7/12/13 at 10:32 PM Reply With Quote
Did anyone see comet ison? Took my telescope to work a couple of times and got in extra early (about 5.30am) only for the horizon to be cloudy.

Too late now though. NASA have released video of the comet being destroyed as it travel around the sun.





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Simon

posted on 7/12/13 at 10:36 PM Reply With Quote
Just bought my first telescope a week or so back, and it's been cloudy since!

I'd strongly recommend you get something like the Google Skymap app for your smartphone - you point it at the sky and it'll show you what's there or you can search for certain things and it'll guide you to it; whether it's a galaxy/star or constellation etc.

Also something like this http://www.isstracker.com/ actually shows you where the ISS is; data from http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/realdata/tracking/ which has searchable db for your location, telling you when you'll be able to see it, for how long and how high in the sky it'll be (just make sure your watch is set to the correct time or you'll miss it) )

As said, get yourself to some proper dark skies, wrap up this time of year; maybe a campbed/reclining chair and just look at the sky (you will spot satellites - feint lights a long way away, but moving). Also, get a book on facts as you'll look for things like the star Betelgeuse in top left of Orion which if it was where our sun is, would reach past Mars - it is vast, yet there are other stars which dwarf it (it may go supernova at any time - might already).

Have a look hear for some interesting stuff:

http://www.quantrek.org/size_comparison/size_comparison.htm

ATB

Simon

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big-vee-twin

posted on 7/12/13 at 11:12 PM Reply With Quote
Do not buy any telescopes from Lidl or the like as they are toys and a waist of money, also do not buy anything with a lens less than 70mm.

Look for brands as skywatcher or celestron for a good starter telescope.

You will not see anything on the moon and everything is in black and white do not expect to see colours.

Start with a simple scope one that can be set up easily and can be transported easily. The Starwatcher mercury 705 is a good starter scope have a look on the first light optics website.

Also subscribe to the earthsky website it let's you know what is happening up there every day via email.

[Edited on 7/12/13 by big-vee-twin]





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Daddylonglegs

posted on 8/12/13 at 09:59 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by big-vee-twin
Do not buy any telescopes from Lidl or the like as they are toys and a waist of money, also do not buy anything with a lens less than 70mm.

Look for brands as skywatcher or celestron for a good starter telescope.

You will not see anything on the moon and everything is in black and white do not expect to see colours.

Start with a simple scope one that can be set up easily and can be transported easily. The Starwatcher mercury 705 is a good starter scope have a look on the first light optics website.

Also subscribe to the earthsky website it let's you know what is happening up there every day via email.

[Edited on 7/12/13 by big-vee-twin]


Totally agree. Don't bother with the cheap stuff. Tasco come up a lot but are no good unless you want to spend more on decent eyepieces for them.

Refractors give good magnification for small size, but not too muych light collection. Reflectors (Newtonian) tend to be bigger, more expensive, but better light collection and easier to use once set up as the eyepice is at a more comfortable height. (with refractors the eyepiece is at the lower end of the telescope. As already said, min 70mm for refractor, and probably 4 1/2" to 6" for reflector.

Binoculars are a good starting point though, can see the moon really nice through a pair of 10 x 50.

Pleny of good stuff on Google to keep you busy.

HTH





It looks like the Midget is winning at the moment......

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