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Author: Subject: Driving with one eye!!!!!!
40inches

posted on 20/3/17 at 09:19 AM Reply With Quote
Driving with one eye!!!!!!

I had an op on my right eye last Tuesday It will take 3-6 weeks to heal,then 6-12 months
for sight to return, hopefully.
While I can legally drive with one good eye, has anyone done it? How did you adjust?

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pekwah1

posted on 20/3/17 at 10:05 AM Reply With Quote
not that i have any experience of this personally, just be careful!
those of us with sight in both eye use both for depth perception.
if you close one eye, it can be a struggle to judge the distance that accurately.

That being said, like most things the body would adjust and compensate, although wouldn't be able to give you any idea of times.
I did have a friend who went blind in one eye and he had no problems at all, although had been like that for some years.

Also, i'm not sure what the insurance companies would make of it if you did have an accident after an op. I know you can legally drive as long as you meet the vision criteria, but you know what the insurance companies are like....

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andyace

posted on 20/3/17 at 10:21 AM Reply With Quote
https://www.gov.uk/driving-eyesight-rules

I think the police/insurance would take a dim view if you have not notified the DVLA

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David Jenkins

posted on 20/3/17 at 10:23 AM Reply With Quote
My wife had an op in one eye last year, and the surgeon explicitly told her that she was not allowed to drive until he gave the all-clear at a follow-up examination about 4 or 5 weeks later. She probably would have been able to drive, but legally she wouldn't have a leg to stand on (she chose not to anyway, as she felt that she wouldn't have been able to do it properly).

I would guess that the insurance company would not take kindly to a person driving when told not to by a doctor - in fact, I guess that the DVLA would be pretty upset as well. I know you haven't been told not to drive - but remember there is always the "physically unfit to drive" clause that the police can get you with.

Looking at that DVLA page it does say "You must tell DVLA if you’ve got any problem with your eyesight that affects both of your eyes, or the remaining eye if you only have one eye." (my emphasis). This suggests that driving with 1 eye is OK as long as you have good vision... not sure I'd be comfortable though!

[Edited on 20/3/17 by David Jenkins]





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Mash

posted on 20/3/17 at 10:34 AM Reply With Quote
You must notify your insurance company because you know that if you - God forbid - have an accident, then your insurance company will drop you like a stone, and then you'll be in serious trouble with the DVLA/Police.

The insurance company may be OK with it, but you must give them the opportunity to say yes or no.

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Toprivetguns

posted on 20/3/17 at 10:37 AM Reply With Quote
My brother took his driving test with a one eyed instructor and it worries me that he passed.

Just inform the DVLA and your insurance company for a definitive answer.





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loggyboy

posted on 20/3/17 at 10:38 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by andyace
https://www.gov.uk/driving-eyesight-rules

I think the police/insurance would take a dim view if you have not notified the DVLA


Quite clearly states that if you have problems with both eyes, not one.






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40inches

posted on 20/3/17 at 10:51 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by andyace
https://www.gov.uk/driving-eyesight-rules

I think the police/insurance would take a dim view if you have not notified the DVLA


Driving with one eye isn't a problem, and the DVLA don't need to be notified. Both my insurance companies don't have a problem with it, once the surgeon gives the OK, that will be in 2-5 weeks time.

"You must tell DVLA if you’ve got any problem with your eyesight that affects both of your eyes, or the remaining eye if you only have one eye."
"You don’t need to tell DVLA if you have monocular vision if you’re still able to meet the standards of vision for driving."

My good eye is 20/20, the bad eye was 20/500, central vision before the op.
So, physically and legally there isn't a problem. My question was more about the practicalities of driving with one eye.
Judging distances is more problematic at close range, long range doesn't appear to be a problem.

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nick205

posted on 20/3/17 at 10:53 AM Reply With Quote
My brother in laws father lost an eye some years ago in a car crash - he drives to this day. As mentioned above I believe it's vital to inform your insurer of the change to avoid the risk of them dropping you in the event of an accident.

Did the hospital not give you any detail/guidance on the process?






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40inches

posted on 20/3/17 at 11:00 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by nick205


Did the hospital not give you any detail/guidance on the process?


Yes. I am up to speed with the process of getting back on the road. My question was about the practicalities of doing so

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David Jenkins

posted on 20/3/17 at 11:07 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by 40inches
My good eye is 20/20, the bad eye was 20/500, central vision before the op.



Out of curiosity (and nosiness) - was this for a macular hole? The reason for asking is that you seem to be in a similar state to my wife before she had her op.

Feel free to not answer if you'd rather not. I won't be offended.





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bonzoronnie

posted on 20/3/17 at 11:11 AM Reply With Quote
A former work mate of mine awoke one morning & had gone blind in one eye.
I remember he was told at the time that he was not allowed to drive for 6 weeks, this was to allow his good eye time to adjust to his new level of vision.

The sight of his blind eye never returned but continues to drive to this day.

That was back in the late 70's, I have no idea of today's rules & regs.

As others have said. I am sure that you will soon adjust to your new level of vision.

Hope your eyesight makes a full recovery to normal.

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40inches

posted on 20/3/17 at 11:15 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by David Jenkins
quote:
Originally posted by 40inches
My good eye is 20/20, the bad eye was 20/500, central vision before the op.



Out of curiosity (and nosiness) - was this for a macular hole? The reason for asking is that you seem to be in a similar state to my wife before she had her op.

Feel free to not answer if you'd rather not. I won't be offended.


Don't want to offend you David
Yes a Macular hole. An interesting operation, done under local anaesthetic, took about 1.5 hours.
How is your wife? I hope everything turned out OK for her.

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David Jenkins

posted on 20/3/17 at 11:19 AM Reply With Quote
You'll be pleased to know that it worked very well for her - it's always nice to know that the op you've just had worked for someone else! Her vision problems have all gone since the op, apart from the fact that she has to have a cataract op soon; it's a common thing after a macular hole op, although much easier and quicker.





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40inches

posted on 20/3/17 at 11:37 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by David Jenkins
You'll be pleased to know that it worked very well for her - it's always nice to know that the op you've just had worked for someone else! Her vision problems have all gone since the op, apart from the fact that she has to have a cataract op soon; it's a common thing after a macular hole op, although much easier and quicker.


That's good to know.
A Caratact is inevitable apparently The gas bubble affects the inner part of the lens and the Steroid eye drops
the outer part.
Something to look forward to, and the fact that there is a 50% chance of the other eye following the first.

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hearbear

posted on 20/3/17 at 01:06 PM Reply With Quote
I have had an op on my foot and 12 weeks minimum not allowed to drive and have to check with insurance to make sure OK to resume driving so I would check.





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morcus

posted on 20/3/17 at 01:48 PM Reply With Quote
Wasn't there a one eyed racing driver a few years ago who tried to get the people that run LeMans to let him race because they didn't allow it based on requirements originally for flying planes?





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Phil.J

posted on 20/3/17 at 03:43 PM Reply With Quote
There was a very quick scottish single seater hillclimb driver a few years ago, Martin Piaccini. He had only one eye and he used to say think how quick I'd be if I had two!
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shindha

posted on 20/3/17 at 03:47 PM Reply With Quote
Slightly amusing anecdote, Moshe Dayan was an Israeli politician and general he only had one eye. Whilst driving one day got stopped by the police the officer said do you know you were speeding? to which he replied I only have one eye I can keep it on the road or on the speedometer.
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David Jenkins

posted on 20/3/17 at 04:47 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by 40inches
A Caratact is inevitable apparently The gas bubble affects the inner part of the lens and the Steroid eye drops
the outer part.
Something to look forward to, and the fact that there is a 50% chance of the other eye following the first.


At least the cataract op is regarded as a minor op now, and routine. Hope the odds are in your favour for the other eye.





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gremlin1234

posted on 20/3/17 at 07:13 PM Reply With Quote
I found this comprehensive artical

"Is a one eyed racing driver safe to compete? Formula one (eye) or two?"
in the
British Journal of Ophthalmology
on the British Medical Journal web site


http://bjo.bmj.com/content/85/5/619.full
or pdf at
http://bjo.bmj.com/content/bjophthalmol/85/5/619.full.pdf

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907

posted on 22/3/17 at 10:06 AM Reply With Quote
Lots of people can't see to drive with two eyes. I know a woman who can't see anything to either side.
I've stood at the roadside and waved to her. No response.
A bloke I know, can't read his dash instruments. Not even the big speedo figures.

Didn't (the old) Top Gear do a survey and find 1 in 4 fail the numberplate reading test?
VBH delivered the results to 10 Downing St.


The brain learns to adapt to one eyed vision, just go steady for a while. Keep an eye on the speedo. (Sorry)

Paul G





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MikeCapon

posted on 22/3/17 at 01:02 PM Reply With Quote
A friend of mine who I raced bikes with lost an eye in a accident. He was a quick lad and got back racing as soon as he was healed. He went on to race in 500 GPs where perception of distance is pretty critical so as far as road driving goes there can be no problem.





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BenB

posted on 22/3/17 at 01:18 PM Reply With Quote
Can you drive with one eye- yes.
Will an insurance policy use every trick in the book to avoid paying out- yes.

Seen it happen to patients of mine. No point asking them either, they'll like say no just to reduce their liabilities!

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