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Author: Subject: Buying a car with no ID - plates or VIN
Simon

posted on 24/5/19 at 07:23 PM Reply With Quote
Buying a car with no ID - plates or VIN

Peeps,

I've seen an old car that I'm tempted with but seller says it has no ID (ie plates/vin etc) which has put me off completely.

He's talking about q plates as a way around it but that's a no-no (on a classic) in my book. Wouldn't it also need an IVA of sorts?

Anyway, thoughts please though I'm 99.99999% against it atm especially as "pukka" cars aren't much more.

Cheers

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gremlin1234

posted on 24/5/19 at 07:39 PM Reply With Quote
short answer:
simply walk away

long answer:
why does it have no ID?

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Simon

posted on 24/5/19 at 08:25 PM Reply With Quote
No idea though he says he's had it for 35 years

I was quite keen till he mentioned that it had no id etc

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CosKev3

posted on 24/5/19 at 09:47 PM Reply With Quote
It's either stolen,or the ID has gone on a stolen car

No chassis number on a production car would mean it's been cut out,or ground off?

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cliftyhanger

posted on 24/5/19 at 10:08 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by CosKev3
It's either stolen,or the ID has gone on a stolen car

No chassis number on a production car would mean it's been cut out,or ground off?


Not at all.Remember cars prior to 74 (or is it 72, or some other date) do not have to have a commission plate or chassis number.
Even then commission numbers were usually pop riveted on, and often removed during bodywork, and subsequently lost. I have had several cars where I have bought blank plates and stamped them, all quite legal.

However, proving the age of the vehicle can be difficult, though the DVLA recognised clubs can offer assistance in dating a car, and DVLA will issue an age related plate. So if the car was (say) a mk3 spitfire, the club will inspect in person, determine what year the car was made from features etc, and that is enough. This is not uncommon.

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CosKev3

posted on 25/5/19 at 08:28 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by cliftyhanger
quote:
Originally posted by CosKev3
It's either stolen,or the ID has gone on a stolen car

No chassis number on a production car would mean it's been cut out,or ground off?


Not at all.Remember cars prior to 74 (or is it 72, or some other date) do not have to have a commission plate or chassis number.
Even then commission numbers were usually pop riveted on, and often removed during bodywork, and subsequently lost. I have had several cars where I have bought blank plates and stamped them, all quite legal.

However, proving the age of the vehicle can be difficult, though the DVLA recognised clubs can offer assistance in dating a car, and DVLA will issue an age related plate. So if the car was (say) a mk3 spitfire, the club will inspect in person, determine what year the car was made from features etc, and that is enough. This is not uncommon.


Yeah that's ok if its historic!

The OP said 'old',depends on what he classes as 'old' as 1980's cars are now nearly 40years old

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Simon

posted on 25/5/19 at 04:46 PM Reply With Quote
It's a 1962 Morris Minor but I think I'd rather spend the extra on a car with some provenance
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gremlin1234

posted on 25/5/19 at 07:36 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Simon
It's a 1962 Morris Minor but I think I'd rather spend the extra on a car with some provenance
I guess it may have lost its number plate (reg no) as a vanity/ageless plate. if you can get any (provable) id on it, you should be able to get it re-registered with an age related plate.

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cliftyhanger

posted on 26/5/19 at 06:19 AM Reply With Quote
British motor heritage "may" be able to help from the engine number if that is still original. They can do a basic search for a few quid, and if that works they can do a full certificate which is as good as it gets for proof of ID.

But if it is not worth the extra effort, there are probably plenty more out there.

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907

posted on 27/5/19 at 09:56 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Simon
It's a 1962 Morris Minor but I think I'd rather spend the extra on a car with some provenance





If it has no plates or VIN how do you know its a 1962 ?

Engines in those days were past their sell by date at 50k so no guarantee with engine numbers.
Genuine re-cons were painted gold and back street re-cons were often painted... er ... gold.

Paul G





Member of the Suttol Owners Club, the MX5 Owners Club and the BMMC

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nick205

posted on 29/5/19 at 09:18 AM Reply With Quote
Personally I'd move on and look somewhere else. Something doesn't seem right about it to me and why involve yourself with the potential hassle and expense of trying to resolve it with no certainty of doing so.
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