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Author: Subject: What do you do for a living?
bigdrew

posted on 25/6/19 at 08:23 PM Reply With Quote
What do you do for a living?

I can't image too many sitting behind a desk on here - So I am intrigued what do you do!?

There must be some pretty varied and interesting jobs..

I work for a large aerospace engineering firm looking after and programming a handful of CMM's (Co-ordinate Measuring Machines)

(Sorry if this has been done before and I've missed it!)

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r1_pete

posted on 25/6/19 at 08:56 PM Reply With Quote
Spent my working life in IT building & maintaining high end mainframe systems.

Retired 12 years early 2.5 years ago, never looked back...

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myke pocock

posted on 25/6/19 at 09:09 PM Reply With Quote
Retired!!! Thats a job.
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Schrodinger

posted on 25/6/19 at 09:16 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by myke pocock
Retired!!! Thats a job.


Ditto
But used to work in an office





Keith

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r1_pete

posted on 25/6/19 at 09:18 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by myke pocock
Retired!!! Thats a job.


Yeah its a tough one...

Spend most mornings planning the days activity...

And the afternoons rescheduling it to tomorrow

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SteveWalker

posted on 25/6/19 at 09:20 PM Reply With Quote
I do sit behind a desk!

I am an Control and Instrumentation Engineer and have worked specifying, designing, checking and approving other people's designs, etc. for control panels, systems, motor control centres, field instrumentation and cabling in various industries, including petrochemicals, pharmaceuticals, potable water, waste water, general industrial and nuclear.

These days it consists almost mainly of writing specifications for hardware, software and processes and checking other people's designs.

SteveW

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SJ

posted on 25/6/19 at 09:20 PM Reply With Quote
Sales and marketing for a large IT vendor. Spend a fair amount of time desk bound, but also get to travel a bit as I cover EMEA and occasionally need to go to the US.
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myke pocock

posted on 25/6/19 at 09:47 PM Reply With Quote
Yep, planning when to take a brew, what time is lunch, does the dog need one or two walks, can I afford some bits for all my cars etc. Lifes a real bummer when you are retired. OH forgot the hassle of getting a doctors appointment, taking twice as long to walk to the end of the road, falling asleep in the chair, remembering to take all the tablets, getying awl mie wordz spelt rong, taking all day to do a job that used to take half the day. Its a tough job this retirement lark!!!!
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40inches

posted on 25/6/19 at 10:34 PM Reply With Quote
I'm in the retired business, and doing very well thank you
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pigeondave

posted on 25/6/19 at 10:46 PM Reply With Quote
Structural engineer

I do as little as possible as the computer does it all for me, the most I have to do is press the design button.

When I did smaller stuff, often the builder would tell me what to do as he knows best and we over design everything anyway.

Now I'm on bigger things it useless Architects who can't make up their minds.

Any youngsters reading this. Don't go in to structural engineering, do accountancy or learn to code.

[Edited on 25/6/19 by pigeondave]

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se7ensport

posted on 25/6/19 at 10:58 PM Reply With Quote
Predominantly desk bound IT consultant; requirements through to implementation. Screensaver on client laptop is my car at full tilt spitting flames.

Spend the last 7 years very close to the aerospace industry, but far from a typical aero engineer; I can improvise and fully practical in that I can weld and regularly make bucks for fibreglass items.

IT provides the funds, donít assume that sitting behind a desk makes you incompetent at engineering. That said there are plenty out there, especially as you get towards competition, that have money and no mechanical sympathy or ability to build themselves.

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Abe

posted on 25/6/19 at 11:03 PM Reply With Quote
Interesting, I was going to ask this question at some point
Used to be a mechanic/restoration and apprenticed at DK engineering working on Ferrariís etc (many moons ago now) now Iím a self employed Rehabilitation Engineer contractor for various NHS wheelchair services around the country, I design, make, install and program special control systems for disabled people among other things. Lots of modifications to seating systems, plastic work, foam work, metal work etc. Interesting job working with physiotherapists and other healthcare teams.

[Edited on 25/6/19 by Abe]

[Edited on 25/6/19 by Abe]

[Edited on 26/6/19 by Abe]

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watsonpj

posted on 25/6/19 at 11:07 PM Reply With Quote
Yep mainly desk work here. Started in mechanical engineering, then systems engineering and now a technical director making downhole tools for the oil industry.
It's great to get out in the garage and get my hands dirty as opposed to reading specs and writing reports etc and do stuff in an unstructured way.

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Sam_68

posted on 25/6/19 at 11:33 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by pigeondave
Now I'm on bigger things it useless Architects who can't make up their minds.

Any youngsters reading this. Don't go in to structural engineering...



I started my career in a Structural Engineers' office, but quickly realised that I didn't want to play second fiddle in the design team to the Architect, whilst getting paid a lot less for the privilege.

I now run my own architectural practice and planning consultancy, and am bloody glad I made the move.

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Eddie1978

posted on 25/6/19 at 11:51 PM Reply With Quote
I get to stand about waiting for things to break.

I work for a plant manufacturer and my job is to be on call, I cover mechanical issues, but fluid power and auto electrics are my speciality.

Its a strange job I can spend all week wandering about drinking coffee and not open the toolbox but then you get a shift from hell, its always been all or nothing,

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nero1701

posted on 26/6/19 at 06:45 AM Reply With Quote
Started out as a mechanical engineering workshop technician...
Then Technical Sales of PLC and Automation equipment

Now a teacher of Electronic Engineering, 3D Design, CAD, Engineering Science, Mechatronics, Further Math and Electrical Science..

I want to retire but my car habit keeps me poor

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steve m

posted on 26/6/19 at 06:52 AM Reply With Quote
Spent 38 years behind a desk, working as a Crew controller, for 3 airlines its a poo job, and VERY stressful

Took redundancy 3 years ago, and now deliver Brand new cars all over the south ish of England

I love my job and life now, and now only do 4 days a week, Money isn't very good, and its a zero hours contract, but suits me fine ! as its true, money isn't everything

I would recommend any one who is in a poo or stressful job, get out now, and do something you enjoy

My plan is next year when im 60, is to drop to 2 or 3 days a week, and draw some pension to supplement

steve





Thats was probably spelt wrong, or had some grammer, that the "grammer police have to have a moan at




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T66

posted on 26/6/19 at 07:23 AM Reply With Quote
As a school leaver I went straight into the garage, served my time as an HGV fitter. Got paid off 4 years later, a year on the dole, then joined the Police. Did my 30 years, 24/7 uniform, tech surveillance, and then my last 10 years on helicopters.

Retired just over 2 years ago, and if Im honest it has taken me quite a while to adjust. Drove for ASDA for 3 weeks and left, worked in an aircraft paintshop for 6 months and left.

Now I just go fishing, and move things round in my garage. Totally get the other retirement comments.








"One day I will grow up, But only for the day"

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snapper

posted on 26/6/19 at 07:30 AM Reply With Quote
So far a lot of engineering and IT

Iíll change that, Iím a qualified Photographer and Associate of the British Institute of Professional Photography, I have been doing this for 45 years now (scary isnít it) mostly salaried but some periods of freelancing. I have been working for the U.K. MOD since 1990 in different locations and roles.
Itís much tougher than it sounds but itís been a good career so far.





I eat to survive
I drink to forget
I breath to wee my ex wife off (and now my ex partner)

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nick205

posted on 26/6/19 at 07:32 AM Reply With Quote
Early working life as an electronics and PCB engineer (behind a desk).

The moved to a sales role involving much traveling by car and plane.

Now work in a sales management role (back behind a desk). A head injury and resulting epilepsy = no driving now so the previous role came to an end.

Unusually in this day and age I've stayed with the same employer throughout. I've seen company's management come and go and the company go bust and re-evolve. Sometimes interesting, sometimes boring and sometimes I think perhaps I should move on. Still here and still working though!

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nick205

posted on 26/6/19 at 07:37 AM Reply With Quote
For comparison one of my brother in laws left the British Army a few years ago after serving his 22 year stint. He's transitioned to civilian life and work now, but I know he found it quite a challenge. He'd got very used to being allowed to shout at new recruits during training. In civilian working life he found this adjustment difficult - people in his team got offended when he shouted at them
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T66

posted on 26/6/19 at 07:48 AM Reply With Quote
I cannot put my finger on exactly what it is that caused me the problem transitioning back to being human, the Police does have similarities with the Military. Certainly dont miss the nightshifts, cancelled rest days or zero family time.

Must dash the grass needs cut....





"One day I will grow up, But only for the day"

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Ivan

posted on 26/6/19 at 08:03 AM Reply With Quote
Retired municipal engineer at 52 - been 18 years now - still regularly head hunted for consulting or advisory purposes. Try to limit working to only 6 months a year and then only from home.
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BenB

posted on 26/6/19 at 08:20 AM Reply With Quote
Definitely desk job- work as a GP. I actually spend a fair proportion of my time in meetings (more sitting down!) but I do occasionally get to see real live patients. It's good to keep one's hand in (insert obligatory gynaecology joke here).
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Camber Dave

posted on 26/6/19 at 08:36 AM Reply With Quote
Personally I have been 53 years on the Spanners. Apprenticeship on lorries (as they used to be called).
Then Lotus dealership and many garages in Bristol.
Parallel career as mechanic in club motorport in spare time. Later full time (well Feb till Octís !) on a team for 4 years.
I have been paid to work on every type of 4 wheel vehicle from a 1902 Showmans Traction engine to a ground up rebuild of a Copersucar F1 car.
Hoping to retire at 70 and finish my Sylva Leader project.

My kitcar customers are mostly as previously posted. With high proportion of I T related occupations.
As you would expect from West Country area, a lot of aircraft and helicopter engineers.
Also many employed by the MOD and their contactors.
Probably about 30% of my customers are retired.

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