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Author: Subject: Are you getting old....
Mr Whippy

posted on 14/6/20 at 10:42 PM Reply With Quote
Are you getting old....

So at the end of this month I'll be 47 not quite sure where all those years seem to have vanished too...

The reason for this post is just a reminder to us all to check your health and unlike me visit the doctor a bit more frequently than 8 years ago. You see being married and having two children has obviously done me no favours at all with my health, not forgetting the passing of all those years and putting on a stone in weight. I'm quite "fit", I cycle at least an hour every day, feel perfectly fine and am always very busy. I gave up caffeine coffee over a year ago (haven't missed it at all), however when I went to the doctors last Thursday, oh boy reality check time! That evening I was in hospital , blood sample, ECG, X-rays and other samples...

Problem? Blood pressure was mental high at 185/120, it did come down a bit that day but I was a the top of their chart, in fact on some charts I was not even on the page in some kind off of no mans land of extreme pressure!

So I'm on some little white tablet a day, have stopped all coffee, only drinking water and am dieting like a boss. I've bought a blood pressure measuring machine which was only £40 although you can get cheaper. I'm doing 3 measurements every day, plus my weight and plugging that into a spreadsheet to see my progress. In 5 days am now at 151/101 but want to be down in the green something like 100/70. So really what I'm saying is do yourself a favour and visit the doctors rather more frequently than me and to make sure you are as healthy as you think.

Cheers





[Edited on 14/6/20 by Mr Whippy]

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craig1410

posted on 15/6/20 at 01:14 AM Reply With Quote
Hey Mr Whippy!
Thanks for sharing your story and for the sound advice to be a bit more proactive with our health. I’m glad that you got checked out and are now hopefully on the road to recovery.

I know I’m not as fit as I was this time last year and have already started to put that right. I already track my heart health on my Apple Watch but it wouldn’t hurt to get hold of a blood pressure monitor and check that too.

Get well soon and thanks again for your timely reminder to stay healthy!
Best,
Craig.

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swanny

posted on 15/6/20 at 06:50 AM Reply With Quote
i wonder if there would be any appetite for a thread on the forum for health progress? might be a good way to support each other?
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steve m

posted on 15/6/20 at 07:40 AM Reply With Quote
Hi all

I can sympathise with the above, as I at around 24 I had series heart problems, never found out why, and around 40, had very high blood pressure, and was put on Candersartin had ecgs, etc, and 24 hour moniters
My blood pressure was caused totally by stress and work,

However was it, as I am now 60, and in the last 3 months lost half a stone, no longer eat so much crap, as in 3 bags of crisps a day
mcdonalds a couple of times a week, we have a pressure machine, and both of us are now in the 130/85 bracket,

and that is normal, I don't think Mr whippey will ever get to 100/70, as that seems very low

but keep doing what you are, and the weight and pressure will drop

steve





Thats was probably spelt wrong, or had some grammer, that the "grammer police have to have a moan at




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Bluemoon

posted on 15/6/20 at 08:12 AM Reply With Quote
All good points and thanks for the reminder, having had kids, the last 10 years have gone very quickly... You end up focusing on others forgetting about you own health..
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nick205

posted on 15/6/20 at 08:15 AM Reply With Quote
A good mention MR Whippy, I suspect many of us have issues of one sort or another and no idea. SWMBO switched me to decaf coffee 6 years ago now and (as you say) I didn't really notice the change taste wise. I did notice I sleep better though, which has to be a better thing.

My GP surgery has a walk-in and self-use blood pressure test machine. Takes 10 mins to do and I pass the GP's once a week so really ought to use it more. I'm sure many other GP surgeries have the same devices available.

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SJ

posted on 15/6/20 at 09:21 AM Reply With Quote
I thought all the stuff about coffee increasing blood pressure was wrong? I pretty much only drink coffee and have 5-6 a day of proper espresso with a bit of cream and hot water

[Edited on 15/6/20 by SJ]

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MikeR

posted on 15/6/20 at 09:22 AM Reply With Quote
I want to echo this - I put off going to the doctors after a slightly scary moment cause I was busy. A few days later i had a repeat so reluctantly went to see the doctor.

The scary moment was probably down to overwork and lack of sleep. However that visit prompted a full MOT which found cancer. Luckily it was found years earlier than it probably would normally be found and means I've had successful treatment.

We're not indistructable.
We're not imortal.
The sooner its found the easier it is to fix.

Think of yourself like a car - you can ignore that oil drip from the engine or you can fix it now. Fix it now and find the sump plug is lose - easy fix & simple to check for the next few months. Leave it till the plug falls out, you lose oil presure and throw a bearing, which then ends up with a rod throug the block.


(and its far easier to say this than to do it - i've been miserable with an on / off headache every few hours for 9 days before my wife persuaded me to call the doctors last week. Sorted within 3 days)

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Irony

posted on 15/6/20 at 09:28 AM Reply With Quote
After a certain age (about Level 40) evening sneezing wrong or sleeping funny can be crippling!

I went to the Docs about constant headaches 5 years ago and he said 'The human body starts slowly giving up at 25!!! When you get to 35 you start to notice!'

My constant headaches were solved by getting some glasses!

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Irony

posted on 15/6/20 at 09:32 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by SJ
I thought all the stuff about coffee increasing blood pressure was wrong? I pretty much only drink coffee and have 5-6 a day of proper espresso with a bit of cream and hot water

[Edited on 15/6/20 by SJ]


I know a couple of people who do this. I have a max of 2 coffees a day in the week at work but find at the weekend if I don't then a headache isn't far away.

Do you get withdrawal symptoms?

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SJ

posted on 15/6/20 at 09:50 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by SJ
I thought all the stuff about coffee increasing blood pressure was wrong? I pretty much only drink coffee and have 5-6 a day of proper espresso with a bit of cream and hot water

[Edited on 15/6/20 by SJ]


I know a couple of people who do this. I have a max of 2 coffees a day in the week at work but find at the weekend if I don't then a headache isn't far away.

Do you get withdrawal symptoms?
----------------------------
No, doesn't make any difference. Also I regularly have coffee just before bed and sleep just the same. Guess it affects people in different ways. My wife won't drink tea after about 5pm. If she does she can't sleep.

[Edited on 15/6/20 by SJ]

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Mansfield

posted on 15/6/20 at 10:49 AM Reply With Quote
Thank you Mr Whippy, what a great thread - perfectly timed for me as my other half and I were speaking about this only yesterday.

You have inspired me to buy a blood pressure monitor which will be delivered today by Argos. I didn't know decent ones were so cheap.

During the last few years I have not coped as well as I should have with the ever increasing stresses of work and family life and I can feel it taking it's toll as I too approach 50 years. A good result would help relieve some of this stress, a bad result would help the prevention of something grim happening, hopefully. I am not expecting a good result but with how I feel generally I wouldn't anyway!

David

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Charlie_Zetec

posted on 15/6/20 at 11:33 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by steve m
Hi all

I can sympathise with the above, as I at around 24 I had series heart problems, never found out why, and around 40, had very high blood pressure, and was put on Candersartin had ecgs, etc, and 24 hour moniters
My blood pressure was caused totally by stress and work,
steve


I'm now 37, and about 8 years ago suffered some real crap at work from my line manager that triggered what I later found out to be ulcerative colitis (a variant of Crohn's disease). I left that job, but endured consistent gut-wrenching agony and severe discomfort passing stools (incl. blood, regularly) for over 18 months before I finally got it checked out and diagnosed. It's a life-long condition that can flare up if not controlled by diet, exercise, and occasionally medication, leaving me in agony and bed-bound for days at a time. Luckily (touch wood) I've not had a severe episode for almost a year now, but it's something that is always there.

When growing up, I was regularly told "Are you a man or a mouse?" if/when I hurt myself; I don't regret or begrudge this in any way as I believe it makes people think about if an illness/injury is actually worthy of professional medical attention, rather than hypochondriacs that frequent the doctors or (worse still) hospital for paracetamol and a plaster - but it's true that we're not immortal, and general health should be more of a concern/checking point for people.

But then again, that's the joy of hindsight - as my dad would say "age and experience will always beat youth and enthusiasm".





Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity!

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Deckman001

posted on 15/6/20 at 01:15 PM Reply With Quote
HI all, Yes a very interesting thread.

I'm 51 in a few days and the last 10 years are telling me i'm getting older. Have had the advantage of changing from site work to working in an office, until the lock down ended and I've had to make up a lack of labour in our workforce by going back out to sites as well as doing my office job after.
Boy do i ache these days, little nicks of cuts on my hands hurt more so i notice them more than old times and seam to take longer to heal, aches take longer to go away, and daft injuries are staring to occur without doing anything unusual.

I guess we all just need to learn to slow down a bit as we get older, but to always try to do as much as possible or else you'll stop early.

I've been very lucky and not needed see my doc for about 15 years so far, although i did a 'walk in' session about 6 months ago after breathing problems, only to find out i wasn't cleaning out my water bottle often enough when i swim each week

For me it's a 'brain' thing. I must realise i'm getting older and should attempt a bit less of exercises. As we get older, we take longer to recover.

Jason

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ianhurley20

posted on 15/6/20 at 01:37 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Charlie_Zetec


I'm now 37, and about 8 years ago suffered some real crap at work from my line manager that triggered what I later found out to be ulcerative colitis (a variant of Crohn's disease). I left that job, but endured consistent gut-wrenching agony and severe discomfort passing stools (incl. blood, regularly) for over 18 months before I finally got it checked out and diagnosed. It's a life-long condition that can flare up if not controlled by diet, exercise, and occasionally medication, leaving me in agony and bed-bound for days at a time. Luckily (touch wood) I've not had a severe episode for almost a year now, but it's something that is always there.

When growing up, I was regularly told "Are you a man or a mouse?" if/when I hurt myself; I don't regret or begrudge this in any way as I believe it makes people think about if an illness/injury is actually worthy of professional medical attention, rather than hypochondriacs that frequent the doctors or (worse still) hospital for paracetamol and a plaster - but it's true that we're not immortal, and general health should be more of a concern/checking point for people.

But then again, that's the joy of hindsight - as my dad would say "age and experience will always beat youth and enthusiasm".


Hi Charlie - my son is 36 and has ulcerative colitis as well. He had a very severe version of it and 10 years ago had his bowel completly removed, followed by a second operation to create an internal pouch. He now takes no drugs (the ones he did have to take destroyed his imune system) although stress (at work) can still cause somme issues occasionally. He has managed to put weight back on, plays rugby and to look at him you would never know that anything had ever been wrong with him. I hope you don't have to go through what he did but if it does one day get to that point the outcome will probably be better than you feared. Fingers crossed





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David Jenkins

posted on 15/6/20 at 05:45 PM Reply With Quote
Age can get you in various ways - in my case, I went to the doctor because I kept getting urinary infections once or twice per year. Men shouldn't get urinary infections very often, due to the length of plumbing involved...

Got sent off for a blood test, then a day or so later I got a forceful phone conversation with the doctor, along the lines of "you have an appointment at the hospital tomorrow, be there". I am now in the 3rd year of treatment for prostate cancer, a month's worth of radiotherapy followed by a 3-year course of hormone drugs. Hopefully the drugs will finish in December, as long as my PSA score remains very low (currently too low to measure apparently, but that's mostly due to the drugs). Fortunately mine was stage 2, meaning that it hadn't spread into my bones (I was checked for that anyway, as part of the investigation).

Then it's 2 years of monitoring to make sure it's gone away... Very scary times for me and my wife in the beginning (she suffered depression because of the stress in the family).

So fellas, if you get to 40+ and your waterworks start to misbehave, TAKE NOTICE and see a doctor. Catch it early enough and it's far more treatable. Don't ignore it, whatever you do - the doctor won't criticise you if it's a false alarm.





The older I get, the better I was...

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steve m

posted on 15/6/20 at 06:03 PM Reply With Quote
We have to remember, that a thousand years ago, living to the late 20's was rare. and even a hundred years ago, 50-60 was VERY old

yet I do not feel old at 60, but ask me again in a year or so !!





Thats was probably spelt wrong, or had some grammer, that the "grammer police have to have a moan at




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steve m

posted on 15/6/20 at 06:11 PM Reply With Quote
"So fellas, if you get to 40+ and your waterworks start to misbehave, TAKE NOTICE and see a doctor. Catch it early enough and it's far more treatable. Don't ignore it, whatever you do - the doctor won't criticise you if it's a false alarm. "

Mine did David, refused me tests, as they are irrelevant, even though my Dads brother died of prostate cancer at 57, and Dad had it at 63

Luckily I have written evidence from the then head practitioner to say the above, so if I do get it, I will sue for millions

I paid for an independant test, and came back clear





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MikeR

posted on 15/6/20 at 06:37 PM Reply With Quote
The PSA test is what saved my life. Diagnosed at 44. I should never have had the test but the doctor did the works. The rules state (iirc) over 50 for white men, 45 for black men (genetically more prevalent).

If I'd waited till I was 50 it would have been game over as it was already aggressive and starting to spread.

So after reading this thread how many men are going to the doctor's? Probably none as we're all fine really, it's nothing etc &#9785;&#65039;

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steve m

posted on 15/6/20 at 06:45 PM Reply With Quote
I was told it was for over 60, colour never came into it, as im pink





Thats was probably spelt wrong, or had some grammer, that the "grammer police have to have a moan at




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jacko

posted on 15/6/20 at 06:47 PM Reply With Quote
Wait until you get to 64 like me
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SJ

posted on 15/6/20 at 06:57 PM Reply With Quote
quote:

TextSo after reading this thread how many men are going to the doctor's? Probably none as we're all fine really, it's nothing etc 



After being prescribed statins and feeling like death for the best part of a year I'm not big on doctors!

I promise I'll go if the water works start playing up though!

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MikeR

posted on 15/6/20 at 07:22 PM Reply With Quote
https://www.google.com/url?q=https://prostatecanceruk.org/about-us/projects-and-policies/consensus-on-psa-testing/psa-consensus-for-health-professiona ls&sa=U&ved=2ahUKEwjHhdDsxITqAhVklFwKHWwaAboQFnoECAMQAg&usg=AOvVaw1Kd_pY0g1F7yDRJSANG_lI

It definitely is 50 generally and 45 for men at risk for PSA Tests. Also if anyone is worried they should do the blood test twice before they do a manual test. So they're only doing the manual test if there is something to concern them.

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JeffHs

posted on 15/6/20 at 07:48 PM Reply With Quote
I'm generally fit and healthy. I drink too much but otherwise I'm ok. I used to do quite a lot of hill walking and one day in deep snow I just couldn't keep up and I was knackered. Thought nothing of it then on another walk I had chest pains and a mate told me of a friend of his with similar symptoms who was in hospital after a heart attack. So I went to see the doc. Life changed then, off to hospital for an exercise stress test, consultant told me I needed a triple bypass and I must just put my feet up and do nothing until the op. In the end I opted for stents (an engineering fix appealed to me rather than butchery). Glad to say that 8 years later I'm still absolutely fine. I was bloody lucky, caught in time before a heart attack.

If you're put on statins and they don't agree with you (muscle pain is a common side effect), go back to the docs and insist on a change until you find one that you can tolerate. I started out on the common cheap one (can't remember the name) which made me feel awful and I switched to Atorvastatin which is just fine with me.

The final twist in the tale is that I was booked, all expenses paid, to be second mechanic for a classic 60s GP car in the Monaco Historic race. The consultant banned the trip saying the worst place in the world to have a heart attack is Monaco unless you're a multi millionaire. Bugger!. but I'm still here, 73 in August.

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Cannonball

posted on 15/6/20 at 09:33 PM Reply With Quote
This might make some of you youngsters think a little about lifestyles.

Eighteen months ago I was sitting listening to a talk when I suddenly felt queasy so I left the room and went outside until it cleared. Ten minutes later I was back inside and feeling ok but when I left around 30 mins later I started to feel unwell again and this time it continued. Nausea but no aches or pains. Around an hour later I was driven to A&E where they prodded and listened then they told me that I had had a massive heart attack so they fired me up to a ward. Later that evening they had to break out the jump leads and give me a jump start. Then a two hour blue light journey to Aberdeen followed where they had to break out the jump leads again before installing a stent. At some point in time time that evening I decided to retire as I had already passed the sell by date.

Six days later I was released and the 100 mile journey home was exhausting. Now my diet has totally changed, no junk food, 99% healthy stuff now, lorry loads of fruit and veg, lots more exercise, cycling and walking but I still indulge in strong coffee daily.

Before all that I was a driver, a non smoker, a very light drinker, around about 82kg, my blood pressure was just on the edge of high now it's normal and ticks over at 45 bpm at rest. Candesartan, Bisoprolol, Asprin and Astrovastatin are the daily dosage until the end. Hill walking is on the to do list when this lockdown is over.

Now I want to build a roadster based on an Mx5 so again I find myself poring over these wonderful pages.

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