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Author: Subject: Starter motor solenoid current draw.
big_wasa

posted on 9/6/07 at 08:22 AM Reply With Quote
Starter motor solenoid current draw.

Starter motor solenoid current draw.

I know it’s been asked before but I can’t find an answer. My immobiliser will handle a max of 18A. Will the solenoid draw more than 15A?
My multi meter will only go to 5A before going pop so I can’t test it. I know the solenoid is just a relay but it has a heavy duty cable running to it in the Sierra.

Starter is from a 2L dohc sierra.

Any ideas ?

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ReMan

posted on 9/6/07 at 08:29 AM Reply With Quote
I'd guess anything up to 20 Amps?
You can work it out if your multimeter is accurate at low resistance. Then divide 12(volts) by the resistance (ohms) will give you the current.
My guess will be that it is less than 5 ohms as they are quite strong on a car starter

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flak monkey

posted on 9/6/07 at 08:29 AM Reply With Quote
I have a 20A meter at home in lynn. Will be back later today if you want to borrow it to try, you are welcome to pop over tomorrow or this later this afternoon if so. You can also borrow the synchro for a while as well.

David





Sera

https://www.facebook.com/sera.jay666

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RazMan

posted on 9/6/07 at 09:06 AM Reply With Quote
I don't think the solenoid alone will draw much more than 10A ...... but that is only my theory so don't take that as gospel





Cheers,
Raz

When thinking outside the box doesn't work any more, it's time to build a new box

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big_wasa

posted on 9/6/07 at 09:13 AM Reply With Quote
Answered my own question Turns out my meter is beter than I remebered.

The answer is just over 10A

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RazMan

posted on 9/6/07 at 10:07 PM Reply With Quote
Blimey! I must be cleverer than I thought!





Cheers,
Raz

When thinking outside the box doesn't work any more, it's time to build a new box

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Peteff

posted on 9/6/07 at 10:22 PM Reply With Quote
I know the solenoid is just a relay but it has a heavy duty cable running to it in the Sierra.

The cable is only a thin one to the solenoid, the thick cable is to the starter after the solenoid has thrown in.





yours, Pete

I went into the RSPCA office the other day. It was so small you could hardly swing a cat in there.

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big_wasa

posted on 9/6/07 at 10:32 PM Reply With Quote
Yep it sure is Pete. But the solenoid wire is heavy duty for 10A
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Hasse

posted on 11/6/07 at 05:31 AM Reply With Quote
May not be so easy to check.

I think most starters has two solenoid windings. One for pull in, high current, and one for holding, low current.

The pull in current is then only present for a very short period, < 1s, and not so easy to messure.

Don´t know the pull in current, but would guess around 20A.

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RazMan

posted on 11/6/07 at 07:02 AM Reply With Quote
As far as I know most Ford solenoids only have the one coil (at least my Duratec has anyway) A dual winding coil system would probably require ecu control wouldn't it?





Cheers,
Raz

When thinking outside the box doesn't work any more, it's time to build a new box

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rusty

posted on 11/6/07 at 11:20 AM Reply With Quote
if you don't have a meter just try different size fuses and see which ones blow. Not the cheapest way but a simple work around.
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Hasse

posted on 11/6/07 at 12:39 PM Reply With Quote
No ECU needed for dual coils.

The pull in coil is disconnected internally as the solenoid reach the end position and the starter starts cranking.

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RazMan

posted on 11/6/07 at 02:48 PM Reply With Quote
Ah I see. So you might have 20A for 0.1 seconds, then 10A while the starter is turning.





Cheers,
Raz

When thinking outside the box doesn't work any more, it's time to build a new box

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Hasse

posted on 12/6/07 at 05:22 AM Reply With Quote
Correct, but the ratio between pull in current, and hold-current would normally be bigger than 2:1. More like 4:1.
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