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Painting with cans finally solved
Mr Whippy - 17/1/24 at 09:42 PM

First off this isn't BS

Like many of you I have been trying to spray cars with cans for decades, only to be very disappointed with the results. Either its dull or ends up with dry spots dry or has runs, even after buying good quality paints. Now don't have any fancy gear or facilities so can only use 1k paints in cans. So while pouring over Youtube vids trying to find out what I'm doing so wrong, I read in one of the comments to heat up the can in water to 60 degs as they say it makes all the difference!

Weird, deliberately heating up a pressurised can is about the last insane thing I would have thought of doing, I mean would it not just explode?!

But regardless I got my infrared thermometer, stuck the can in a freezer bag and then in the kettle outside the house and heated it up to 60. And no it didn't explode. So while simmering my paint and as its snowing here I got my old and dangerous heat gun and warmed up the panel to 20 degs. A good old 2 mins shake of the can and wow this thing is powerful, gave it a light coat first then 2 heavier coats, 50% horizontal over lap, 10 mins apart (can back in kettle between coats).

I'm now on panel 3 and this thing is looking ace! I'm respraying the whole side and back of the Volvo and loving it

So there you go, at long last I can actually paint a car lol. Hope this helps you too. Here's some pics to show you how dirty the garage is in the reflection

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[Edited on 18/1/24 by Mr Whippy]


perksy - 17/1/24 at 09:48 PM

That looks very good

Did use use a ready mixed brand of paint or get some mixed at the local body paint suppies place?

[Edited on 17/1/24 by perksy]


Mr Whippy - 17/1/24 at 10:07 PM

The paint is from Martin Brown (martinbrownpaints.com) and is a custom mix, it's both their metallic base and lacquer. However it's not the paint that's made the differenced as it was their paint I used the last attempt 3 years ago and made a total mess off. Which is why I am having to respray it all over again!


Slimy38 - 18/1/24 at 07:39 AM

Great result, but I have to ask... how did you hold a metal tin at 60 degrees?! I'm assuming it wasn't your other half's favourite oven mitts?


coyoteboy - 18/1/24 at 09:17 AM

Good tip, thanks! I'll try it when I have to respray my poor Toyota. Previously like you I have had awful results and I really didn't want to attack a large area respray without a solution to my poor performance..


nick205 - 18/1/24 at 11:08 AM

Nice work and good tip.

I've been warming my spray cans for a long time. warms the paint and I'm sure helps it mix,flow and spray better. The results speak for themselves.

Like I say nice work!


nick205 - 18/1/24 at 11:36 AM

Re-reading, I don't go to 60...!

Hot tap water does it for me, with the can left in for 10 mins.

Makes the can pleasant to hold when spraying.


Mr Whippy - 18/1/24 at 11:57 AM

quote:
Originally posted by Slimy38
Great result, but I have to ask... how did you hold a metal tin at 60 degrees?! I'm assuming it wasn't your other half's favourite oven mitts?


I must have thick skin as it doesn't bother me! I did notice the label steaming at points when straight out the kettle, must be the glue. It's hot but not too hot to hold. You could wear finger less gloves if your the sensitive type.

Things I note are -

The paint comes out the can very forcefully, you should hear it hit the newspaper, it roars.
The flow rate from the can remains constant right to the end of the can with no spluttering.
The wet area seems to blend perfectly with the next pass of the spray with no blooming.
No runs at all even with a thick coat.
Instantly glossy and does not dull much at all while it dries, probably even less with 2k paint.


gremlin1234 - 18/1/24 at 05:47 PM

quote:
Originally posted by nick205
Re-reading, I don't go to 60...!

Hot tap water does it for me, with the can left in for 10 mins.

Makes the can pleasant to hold when spraying.
if you are using stored hot water, - ie a hotwater cylinder, this should be running at over 60c ( to avoid the risk of legionella ), if its a combi ( heat on demand ) it can be lower

also always a good idea to wear gloves when spraying from cans, to avoid frostbite in your fingers!


coyoteboy - 18/1/24 at 06:30 PM

Frostbite?! Crikey, you must empty cans faster than me 🤣 I rarely notice a drop in temp, let alone get frostbite. Maybe that's why my painting is awful.


Mr Whippy - 18/1/24 at 08:44 PM

I'd have to agree, they do cool down as you spray them due to loss of pressure, you can often feel the level of the contents on the side of the can just from the cold. If you think of a bow torch you can get condensation on the can or even frost in cold weather showing again the level inside. I'm sure I'm not the only one who's tried to get the last breath out a blow torch by heating the can up with my hands

Funnily enough it's so cold out there I'm having to heat the masking tape up in the microwave just to make it usable! It's grim out there and snowing again


Benzine - 18/1/24 at 09:47 PM

Oh god, you'd no be long getting frostbit!

Good thread BTW, I'll try that next time. Have you ever used one of those spray can adapter trigger thingies? Last time I got some spray cans they came with one and I thought it was very good.

[Edited on 18-1-2024 by Benzine]


Mr Whippy - 19/1/24 at 07:15 AM

quote:
Originally posted by Benzine
Oh god, you'd no be long getting frostbit!

Good thread BTW, I'll try that next time. Have you ever used one of those spray can adapter trigger thingies? Last time I got some spray cans they came with one and I thought it was very good.

[Edited on 18-1-2024 by Benzine]


Yeah I think Halfords sells them, not sure I'd trust one with the big cans but they are an improvement. I could 3D print a more substantial one for big cans I suppose. In fact here's a design that clamps to the can, quite like that. Free on Thingiverse "Spray Can Handle to end them all".

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[Edited on 19/1/24 by Mr Whippy]


coyoteboy - 19/1/24 at 11:20 AM

OK I'm guessing we all mean "mildly cold hands" not frostbite Even if the can was made of ice you'd likely not get frostbite.

I will post back here when I've managed to mess mine up again, only this time it'll be a bonnet, in metallic black.

[Edited on 19/1/2024 by coyoteboy]


gremlin1234 - 19/1/24 at 06:36 PM

quote:
Originally posted by coyoteboy
OK I'm guessing we all mean "mildly cold hands" not frostbite Even if the can was made of ice you'd likely not get frostbite.
the nozzle of the tin, can get very very cold when spraying, but perhaps frostnip is a better term.

[Edited on 19/1/24 by gremlin1234]


nick205 - 19/1/24 at 07:23 PM

Combi hot water for me.

Hot, but not painful.

Frostbite....?

My hands haven't got that cold with spray cans.


Mr Whippy - 23/1/24 at 10:25 AM

I did an accidental pressure test while getting distracted by the dog, the cans don't explode at 100degs either


coyoteboy - 23/1/24 at 10:28 AM

quote:
Originally posted by Mr Whippy
I did an accidental pressure test while getting distracted by the dog, the cans don't explode at 100degs either


Being pressure vessels I suspect they have some huge margin, but I am glad. I'm not a tester 🤣


gremlin1234 - 23/1/24 at 03:53 PM

quote:
Originally posted by Mr Whippy
I did an accidental pressure test while getting distracted by the dog, the cans don't explode at 100degs either


I can imagen the conversation:
Wife: What happened to you? why are you covered in paint this time?
whippy: I was looking after the dogs
wife: and?
whippy: well I made a bit of a mess of the kitchen as well
wife: and?
whippy: I thought you might like the 'speckled grey', I could do it in maroon instead.
long suffering wife: do I finally get my new kitchen?

[Edited on 23/1/24 by gremlin1234]


nick205 - 5/2/24 at 04:43 PM

quote:
Originally posted by coyoteboy
quote:
Originally posted by Mr Whippy
I did an accidental pressure test while getting distracted by the dog, the cans don't explode at 100degs either


Being pressure vessels I suspect they have some huge margin, but I am glad. I'm not a tester 🤣




Being pressure vessels (particularly ones sold to the public to mess about with) I'd also imagine they have quite some safety margin designed into them.

From past observation (watching foolish youngsters) I can confirm that safety margin does NOT cover being chucked in a fire!


coyoteboy - 5/2/24 at 04:45 PM

Haha yes. I can personally attest to heinz cans also no being fireproof, but a hot beany shower is possible.