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Author: Subject: Fitness question
zilspeed

posted on 29/3/11 at 02:22 PM Reply With Quote
Fitness question

The problem.

I've never been fit in my life.

I was a skinny kid until I was about 9 or 10 years old.
Then I became a bat fastard until about 3 years ago when I was 42.
That's a whole lifetime of obesity.

At my worst I was 19 stone plus, I'm now 13.5 ish.

I never ever have been fit so I'm not sure how to get there.

I'm cycling every day now in preparation for a charity cycle ride in June.
It's 56 miles, so nothing to any half serious cyclist, but a real battle to me.

As it is, when I come home from work, it takes me all my time to come home and put in a run of about 8 miles.

Any tips welcome in getting my endurance up are most welcome.

Speed I'm not too worried about to be honest, but if I could get my average of around 12 mph on the moderately hilly terrain around here up a bit, that would be pleasing too.

I know, I just have to stick with it, but any tips are most welcome.
I have no delusions about what I can achieve, but if there's anyone with any similar experiences, I would like to hear from you.

Cheers

John F






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NS Dev

posted on 29/3/11 at 02:26 PM Reply With Quote
keep biking, and push harder each day by a measurable amount.

If its a fixed length run, get a speedo on the bike, and zero your run time each time, and just make sure you do the journey say 5 sec quicker each day, as long as its not bad headwind etc. Also, give yourself a couple of days a week off the bike to let things "rebuild"





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YQUSTA

posted on 29/3/11 at 02:28 PM Reply With Quote
When I used to cycle a lot and was with people slower than me I would change down a few gears so that I waqs putting in more effort but going at their speed.

As you only have a limited time to ride it maybe worth a try as you will put more effort in for the same distance/time





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daniel mason

posted on 29/3/11 at 02:29 PM Reply With Quote
Interval training is by far the best way for someone like yourself. If you want me to send you some mags to read through I will do! Anything explosive will really get the muscles working and tire you out






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Craigman9

posted on 29/3/11 at 02:29 PM Reply With Quote
The best way to loose weight and improve stamina and speed is to make a program containing resistance training (weights) along with interval training on a treadmill/bike or outside if possible. It burns around 3x more fat than any steady state training and it also makes time go faster than something monotonous

I have lost just over 20kg in 18 months following a routine like this along with working away etc. I have lots of pictures to remind me too!

[Edited on 29/3/11 by Craigman9]

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zilspeed

posted on 29/3/11 at 02:32 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by NS Dev
keep biking, and push harder each day by a measurable amount.

If its a fixed length run, get a speedo on the bike, and zero your run time each time, and just make sure you do the journey say 5 sec quicker each day, as long as its not bad headwind etc. Also, give yourself a couple of days a week off the bike to let things "rebuild"


The first point is the problem.
Push harder each day by a measurable amount.

Every time I go out, I push as hard as I can.
It doesn't take long before there's nothing left.

If I go out on the road bike, I feel as if I ride like a maniac and go slightly quicker but last no time.
If I go out on the old hybrid, I go a bit slower, but tedn to relax a bit more.

There's no doubt that the road bike is capable of greater things, but it's as if it's writing cheques my legs and lungs can't cash right now.

Regarding speedo.
Yep, got one of them.
And sports tracker on the phone, which is fantastic.
See here.
The horrible truth of my inability






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chrsgrain

posted on 29/3/11 at 02:37 PM Reply With Quote
Hi,

I would get a heart rate monitor, and exercise within a specific heart rate band, don't worry too much about the distance or the speed on the bike, just get your heart rate into the correct training zone (lots of stuff on the net about that) for 30-40 min a day 5 or so days a week, and the fitness will come. I wonder if you are pushing too hard if you are giving it everything every time you go out....

Chris





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zilspeed

posted on 29/3/11 at 02:38 PM Reply With Quote
Ok, I've listened to all of your points and take it all on board.

Last night's run was deliberately at slightly lower pace and longer in duration and I was fine.
Today's run was at higher pace, but it did burn me out a bit.

How about.

Road bike - shorter runs at high speed.
Hybrid bike - longer runs at lower speed.

Repeat ad infinitum.

Then when I get a bit better, the road bike for longer and faster runs.


Mixes it up a bit.

The endurance is the important bit.
The thing I'm doing in June is for a cancer charity and it's not an option to fail or let them down.

__________

Minor edit because you guys think faster than me .

Yes. going to get a heart rate monitor.
Based on having sports tracker etc, a Polar Wearlink is the one for me.
Integrates with the phone and I can see how it ties in with climbing, speed etc.
Point taken

[Edited on 29/3/11 by zilspeed]






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montythemole

posted on 29/3/11 at 02:39 PM Reply With Quote
I can sympathise, this year I got fed up being unfit and joined gym and signed up for 10k run in May having not run since school some 14 years ago.

In 2 months I've gone from not being able to run to postbox without stopping to being able to do 15km at a fair rate and do weekly timed 5km runs with a local organised event. I'm now considering a half marathon this year and full one next.

Although I'm running rather than cycling I was advised to alternate training so aim for a good distance one session, then a short distance at fast time the next to build up. Seems to be working for me so far presume same would apply for cycling (doh! beaten to it!)

I also choose to ditch chocolate (none this year) and cut back on drinking and cheese as the more you weigh the more you have to lug along with you. Also found it makes you consider what you're eating more as you can't just grab a choccie biscuit so makes you consider whether you really need that snack/dessert.

Other hints would be to get a mate to train with as this helped me, and see if there are any events near you to join. The 5km run every Saturday gets me out of bed and running with 100 odd other people keeps you motivated and keen to be overtaken less next week!

Don't forget as well, the less you weigh, the faster your car is!

[Edited on 29/3/11 by montythemole]





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NS Dev

posted on 29/3/11 at 02:42 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by zilspeed
quote:
Originally posted by NS Dev
keep biking, and push harder each day by a measurable amount.

If its a fixed length run, get a speedo on the bike, and zero your run time each time, and just make sure you do the journey say 5 sec quicker each day, as long as its not bad headwind etc. Also, give yourself a couple of days a week off the bike to let things "rebuild"


The first point is the problem.
Push harder each day by a measurable amount.

Every time I go out, I push as hard as I can.
It doesn't take long before there's nothing left.

[/url]


Yep, been there done that! I'm not very technical with my training (or not now as I don't have time due to working for myself all bloody hours of the day and night! ) BUT, with riding to work, it is kept pretty simple, I HAVE to get there, so no options there, and I also had to get there on time, so I just set off EXACTLY my target time before I had to be there, and hoped I never got a puncture! In 4 years I was only late twice!

It was a 13 mile ride on mixed roads with 1 mile of offroad





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zilspeed

posted on 29/3/11 at 02:47 PM Reply With Quote
Ok, I think I have it.

Nights when I have little time.
Short and pacy run.

Nights or days when there is more time.
Longer run at slightly lower pace, greater duration.

This I can do.

Thanks lads.






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blakep82

posted on 29/3/11 at 02:53 PM Reply With Quote
you say you've been cycling every day, but how long have you been doing it for now? if its not been too long, don't expect too much to change too quick. and eat properly!





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Rosco

posted on 29/3/11 at 03:09 PM Reply With Quote
As one of the previous posts mentioned, get a heart rate monitor - I got one about 10 years ago when I started running. They're fantastic and locost-ish. The benefit is that you can see how hard you're pushing yourself - often you'll think you're pushing much harder than you really are - and vs. versa. Once you've worn it for a while you'll know your HR range and limits and can then start training to a specific heart rate zone and interval training to HR zones - and you can make this as scientific (or not) as you want. Personally I run to about 5 zones (gentle warm up <140, deeper warm up 140- 150, steady pace 150-160 for a long run, fast pace for a hard run 160-165, hard but short interval 165-170). I'm 44 now and try to stay below 170. But you need to find your own limits - if you've just started excercising then pushing very high HR is not a good idea.

The other thing with this approach is that you'll learn your maximum sustainable heart rate for an exercsie and if you do an event you can run/cycle to a plan rather than risk being swept away by the occasion.


Last bit of advice - don't eat too many pies.

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zilspeed

posted on 29/3/11 at 03:11 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by blakep82
you say you've been cycling every day, but how long have you been doing it for now? if its not been too long, don't expect too much to change too quick. and eat properly!


Points all taken and most welcome.
You're right, I do have to bear in mind that it takes time.

Anyhow, seeing is this is a techy sortova places, here are my bikes.

First is a Trek 1.1 that you the taxpayer have let me have VAT, income tax and NI free. Thank you !!
This is my road bike. Love the shifters on this one. There's magic going in with these. We still need to develop an understanding.





Then there is old faithfull. The Diamondback Lakeside that my brother lent me a few years ago on the basis that it always belongs to him, but he never actually wants it back. My kind of deal. I like this bike lots. It much more relaxed than the bike above, so I like it more than that bike above at this point. It doesn't ask as much of me.









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zilspeed

posted on 29/3/11 at 03:14 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by RoscoLast bit of advice - don't eat too many pies.



Aww !!!

But I like pies

No, I'm with you here.

I've banned myself from the canteen at work and the cholesterol based goodness therein.
I do feel the benefit.






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Macbeast

posted on 29/3/11 at 05:45 PM Reply With Quote
Don't aim for Olympics. You're trying to get fit and healthy, not turn yourself into an athlete.
Exercise with friends: it's soul-destroying on you own. Make it fun, not work. And well done - good luck.





I'm addicted to brake fluid, but I can stop anytime.

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dmac

posted on 29/3/11 at 06:47 PM Reply With Quote
As others have said, have a couple of days rest a week to recover, if you do get a heart rate monitor then use it to check your resting heart rate every morning as soon as you wake up. This should gradually decrease and is a good indicator of your fitness.

It doesn't matter which bike you use as long as you put the effort in, its all training.

If your goal is a 56 mile run you should be working up to being easily able to cope with doing half of that in one go, so that means you will have to do a few rides of about 28 miles towards the end of your training.

If possible get a mate who is slightly fitter than you to ride with, then you will always be trying to keep up.

Unfortunately once you are over 40 it gets harder and harder to get fit, I'm also trying to get fit again at 51 but just riding 20 miles to work is harder than racing used to be!

Duncan

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adithorp

posted on 29/3/11 at 10:19 PM Reply With Quote
As I see it you need 3 things.
1. Improve you cycling efficency and so ride faster for longer
2. Burn fat and so loose weight.
3. Improve cardio vascular fitness (too many benefits to list).

As a qualified cycling coach, all three will be best met by steady miles in the saddle. Many people ride at too high an intensity when they start cycling. This burns carbs rather than fat, gives you an appitite after, and doesn't encourage the development of good efficent style (riding like a chimp on a rowing machine isn't good). Look to ride at a steady, easy pace, at which you could hold a conversation. Try to get at least one 2 hour ride a week if possible. By mid/late May start introducing some higher intensity into your rides by doing sections of 10-15mins at about the level you could just speak single words.

Stick at it. Keep it steady, regular and often for now. In the words of the great Fausto Coppi, when asked how to become a better cyclist "Ride a bike, ride a bike, ride a bike!".
It will get easier... and put the hybrid away untill you can ride it just to make it easier for family and friends to keep up.

[Edited on 29/3/11 by adithorp]





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coozer

posted on 29/3/11 at 11:42 PM Reply With Quote
I think its a mental thing, attitude that is, dedication.

My father, rest his soul, was very fit, cycled to work nearly 90% of the time for as long as I can remember. He was addicted to the Tour De France always saying he would have loved to have had a bash at it. No diet, no lack of beer and pies...

He had two bikes, a very posh, light thing for racing and going out with the boys in the local cycling club, time trials and what have you. Some bastard nicked it

Then what he called a 'trainer' a regular school boy job with a fixed gear. That was gruelling to ride to say the least, no let up on the pedals. But that was what he did, cycling 10 there, 10 back. Then for a bit after redundancy it was 22 there, 22 back!

Dedication, way of life if you like. This continued until he was 52 where he promptly dropped down dead, quicker than what its took to type!





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