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Author: Subject: Sometimes it's nice to watch a craftsman...
David Jenkins

posted on 13/9/21 at 10:58 AM Reply With Quote
Sometimes it's nice to watch a craftsman...

This isn't something that many people would do on a Locost chassis (although Caterham used to their chassis this way) but it's magic to watch...







The older I get, the better I was...

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nick205

posted on 13/9/21 at 01:15 PM Reply With Quote
It is indeed beautiful to watch - just watched it at work with headphones on to realise a handful of clleagues gathered behind me watching as well.

Some high end (expensive) steel bicycle frames are made this way too. A time consuming process.

ETA - I like the workmans commentary as he's working as well. You can almost feel the concentration in his voice!

Thanks for the post

[Edited on 13/9/21 by nick205]

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loggyboy

posted on 13/9/21 at 01:53 PM Reply With Quote
Is brazing OK on car chassis for IVA?





Mistral Motorsport

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nick205

posted on 13/9/21 at 02:10 PM Reply With Quote
Don't know about IVA.

My undrstanding of the brazing process is that it doesn't melt the parent metals, but flows the rod metal into the join. In simple terms I see it to be a similar to bonding the parent metals. That said many adhesives have properties that allow them to actually flow into the parent material (particularly for timber and plastic adhesive).

I'd guess brazing may be OK for space frame type chassis of limited lifespan, but not for ones intended for long lifespans such as road cars.

Just my thoughts BTW.

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JAG

posted on 13/9/21 at 02:15 PM Reply With Quote
There are plenty of Caterhams on the road, many no doubt still in use, where the chassis have been joined using this method.

It is perfectly acceptable - but I don't know what the IVA Inspector would say





Justin


Who is this super hero? Sarge? ...No.
Rosemary, the telephone operator? ...No.
Penry, the mild-mannered janitor? ...Could be!

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Simon

posted on 13/9/21 at 04:35 PM Reply With Quote
He could do it in 1/10th the the time with tig. Still nice to see the results though.
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Slimy38

posted on 13/9/21 at 07:16 PM Reply With Quote
It's so quiet... I'm used to the frying bacon of Mig, or even the gas flow of TIG, but this is more about the pinging metal as it warms up.

It's a stunning result, great video, thanks!

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40inches

posted on 14/9/21 at 08:18 AM Reply With Quote
Similar to the way I made my racing frames in the 60's, but I used silicone bronze welding, just a bit quicker than brazing.I get the holding your breathe though
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nick205

posted on 14/9/21 at 09:40 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by 40inches
Similar to the way I made my racing frames in the 60's, but I used silicone bronze welding, just a bit quicker than brazing.I get the holding your breathe though



Holding your breath is definitely a concentration thing

When I do it SWMBO tells me to "BREATHE MAN"

I've told her time and time again "not breathing means I'm not concentrating!"

I recall shooting a rifle laying down in a shooting range being taught to breathe in then out and aim/fire at the bottom of the out breath when your body is still.

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JonBowden

posted on 14/9/21 at 04:19 PM Reply With Quote
What is the difference between bronze welding and brazing?





Jon

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Theshed

posted on 14/9/21 at 05:51 PM Reply With Quote
In Bronze welding the parent metals are heated beyond melting point and mixes with the filler. In brazing the parent metals are hot but do not melt.
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tims31

posted on 14/9/21 at 05:52 PM Reply With Quote
Kart chassis used to be bronze brazed like this. It gives a little flex to the joint I believe without being too ridged. Not sure if they are still made this way?

[Edited on 14/9/21 by tims31]





Build: http://www.martinsfurybuild.co.uk/

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hughpinder

posted on 15/9/21 at 08:22 AM Reply With Quote
As I understand it the joints can be as strong as a welded joint, with the slight flexibility an advantage for fatigue resistance, also the parent metal does not get a heat affected zone and you can join dissimilar metals or very thin metal to thick metal more easily.
Good article here:
https://www.machinedesign.com/fastening-joining/article/21832464/when-brazing-beats-welding

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