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Author: Subject: Supplier help for steel rod with threaded end
Mr Whippy

posted on 6/7/24 at 04:23 PM Reply With Quote
Supplier help for steel rod with threaded end

Hi, I'm struggling to find someone who can supply this for a project.

Simply a couple of 1200mm long, 5mm steel rods (mild is fine) with an accurately cut i.e lathe M5 thread on the end, that's all, but not having much luck tbh.

Any ideas, thanks.






[Edited on 6/7/24 by Mr Whippy]





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Sarah

posted on 6/7/24 at 06:30 PM Reply With Quote
When I was at previous job, we got all our studding from https://mbefasteners.co.uk/ but only up to 1m length. Might be of use
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Slimy38

posted on 6/7/24 at 08:59 PM Reply With Quote
I would recommend 'thelatheman' on ebay, he could probably make them up for you?

How accurate does the thread need to be? M5 thread using a hand tool die really wouldn't be difficult, you'd just have to make sure it was square.

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Mr Whippy

posted on 7/7/24 at 07:11 AM Reply With Quote
Thanks for the helpful reply's, I'll look into them





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Mr Whippy

posted on 7/7/24 at 07:26 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Slimy38

How accurate does the thread need to be? M5 thread using a hand tool die really wouldn't be difficult, you'd just have to make sure it was square.




These rods are for model boat propshafts and the thread is for mounting the propellers. I've cut threads before but I'm concerned that doing it by hand will not be accurate enough and the propellers will vibrate. Tbh the more I think about it, that's probably total nonsense and a hand cut thread would be perfectly fine. I'm no doubt just being stupid and should give it a go...

I underestimated the length and complexity of the whole propeller shaft arrangement on this one an could not have really picked a harder one to get working.



[Edited on 7/7/24 by Mr Whippy]





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Slimy38

posted on 7/7/24 at 07:30 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mr Whippy
quote:
Originally posted by Slimy38

How accurate does the thread need to be? M5 thread using a hand tool die really wouldn't be difficult, you'd just have to make sure it was square.




These are for a model boat propshaft and the thread is for mounting the prop. I've cut threads before but I'm concerned that doing it by hand will not be accurate enough and the propeller will vibrate. Tbh the more I think about it, that's probably total nonsense and a hand cut thread would be perfectly fine. I'm no doubt just being stupid and should give it a go...



[Edited on 7/7/24 by Mr Whippy]


For the cost of machining vs the cost of buying replacement metal it would make sense to me. Personally I'd go for a 2 metre length, then cut the thread. If it looks rubbish, cut it off and try again. When you get a thread you're happy with, trim the other end to 1200mm. At least then you're not wasting 1200mm lengths each time you practice.

[Edited on 7/7/24 by Slimy38]

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scudderfish

posted on 7/7/24 at 07:34 AM Reply With Quote
The price of all this good advice is you have to post some pics of the boat
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MikeR

posted on 8/7/24 at 08:05 AM Reply With Quote
Not my area but 1200mm spinning rod sounds like a flexible nightmare. How are you balancing and containing / supporting the prop shaft?
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Mr Whippy

posted on 8/7/24 at 07:08 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by scudderfish
The price of all this good advice is you have to post some pics of the boat




This is it, I'm currently finishing it's 2.4 meter Corvette sister as it is a bit simpler. Both are meant for out local harbour, hence the size... Detail level will be that of an airfix model.



[Edited on 8/7/24 by Mr Whippy]





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scudderfish

posted on 9/7/24 at 05:48 AM Reply With Quote
That's very impressive. How heavy is it? I guess the weight has to be to scale as well to get the waterline correct.
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Mr Whippy

posted on 9/7/24 at 10:50 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by scudderfish
That's very impressive. How heavy is it? I guess the weight has to be to scale as well to get the waterline correct.


A this point it's 18kg but when ballasted, well it's 1/36 scale and the full size was 2,500 tons (full load), so scaled down that's 53.5kg.

My plan is to cast concrete/lead blocks in thin 3D printed shells to match the inner hull shape that I then load in after its been put in the water. There's also four 12v golf kart batteries for the drive and a auxiliary battery for the 18 servos (gun movement etc), lights and 2 smoke generators. Got my work cut out for sure...





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scudderfish

posted on 10/7/24 at 05:30 AM Reply With Quote
Why not ballast tanks? Genuinely curious as molded blocks sounds a faff when water could be pumped in and out as needed.
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Mr Whippy

posted on 10/7/24 at 08:09 AM Reply With Quote
No it's a good point. Ballast tanks were a option and one of the club members oil tanker uses this method as it sits crazy low in the water and obviously works much like this in real life. However researching up about the Fletcher class destroyer highlighted that due to their slender width they were always fighting the low stability by removing various guns/torpedo tubes etc. If I used water to ballast due to the low density the centre of gravity would be too high in the hull. Ideally the mass should be something like a lead lining on the very bottom of the hull as that gives the best stability. This is how I did my first model and it hardly leans at all during turns.





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40inches

posted on 10/7/24 at 08:19 AM Reply With Quote
The Battle of Peasholm in Scarborough is pretty good.
Link

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MikeR

posted on 10/7/24 at 08:56 AM Reply With Quote
I have a vague memory of watching something like that when I was little, possibly at Scarborough. Really enjoyed it.
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Mr Whippy

posted on 10/7/24 at 11:43 AM Reply With Quote
Yeah must be quite a laugh I wish the local club did stuff like that but tbh the average age range of members precludes that lol.

We've been trying to get the council just to fix the leaks in the pond base and keep the water level at a useful level, but it really limits what you can use in it. Next I want to build a 4m battle ship (King George V, done in two sections) but the draught is too great for the pond, unless I reduce it on the model but then it would look daft out the water. I'm going to try the local harbour and see how I get on there with the big models.

Never did get a reply from thelatheman. But I'll take the advice above and give it a go doing the thread by hand, I have an idea of printing a tool guild to keep it straight while cutting .





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