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Author: Subject: New U.S. Based Locost Started
the JoKeR

posted on 18/6/06 at 01:39 AM Reply With Quote
New U.S. Based Locost Started

I've finally got my donor teardown done (1993 Chevy S10 w/2.8L V6) and have started building the body. I am trying to re-use as much of the original vehicle as possible, including the rear axle which is slightly narrower than I had hoped. The space between the drum backing plates is 47" and the open space between the tires is 45-1/2". I had hoped to build a 46" wide McSorley +442, but have changed it to a +422 (2" wider than "stock" in the rear instead of 4" ). This led to some changes which needed to be made in the McSorley plans, so I re-drew the top and bottom rails in a way that the front end (everything in front of the feet) will be as shown on the plans, and everything behind the feet will taper back about 2 degrees giving me an inch less space per side.

First step for the day was to clear enough room to work. This included moving my 4x8 workbench about 4 feet away from the wall so I could work all the way around it. I've still easily got enough room to park a car in the garage without moving the bench.




Fastforward a few hours and the bottom rails are done. Measured diagonally it is about 1/16" off from square. I'm very happy with how accurate my bandsaw is, and on this somewhat light tube it cuts fast enough to keep me busy.




This is the "trick" to my re-designed plan. The section shown on my new top rails is normally made from a straight piece, but at the firewall I've cut the top tube and angled it in by 2 degrees. Everything in front is "stock" and everything behind is 2" narrower than stock. In the picture, the top angle shows 182 degrees instead of the 'normal' 180 degree straight tube.




For the actual construction, I cut through three sides of the tube (leaving the outside edge uncut) and bent it in to the angle of my plan. Although the bonnet will span this area, I'm expecting the angle to be mild enough as to be unseen. Hopefully...!




By the end of construction day 2 I'd like to have the main body structure fabricated far enough that I can test-fit the nosecone and "test drive" the car!





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leto

posted on 18/6/06 at 06:21 AM Reply With Quote
Congratulation on your build start! Building the frame is so much fun
As you say, the bonnet might give you some headache, I'm looking forward to see how you solve it.
Best of luck with the build!





“I'm gonna ride around in style
I'm gonna drive everybody wild
'Cause I'll have the only one there is a round”. (J. Cash)

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stevec

posted on 18/6/06 at 10:14 AM Reply With Quote
Good luck with the build.
Why the bottle of water?
Why no bottles of what made Milwaukee famous?
All the best.
Steve.

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the JoKeR

posted on 18/6/06 at 02:43 PM Reply With Quote
Steve-
It was 93 degrees yesterday with plenty of humidity, so the water really hit the spot! Plus, I don't like beer. I do keep a case of beer in the garage fridge though - it's always a good bribe for the neighbors when I need help!

The current selection: Coke, Diet Coke, Black Cheery Vanilla Diet Coke, Root Beer, Mountain Dew, Code Red Mountain Dew, Water, Miller, and Miller Light. Gotta be ready for anything!





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C10CoryM

posted on 18/6/06 at 05:27 PM Reply With Quote
"Miller, and Miller Light"

You're not kidding, you really don't like beer if thats what you're serving .

Sorry, couldn't resist. Im just jealous as I don't have any shop space to play with right now and looks like you have lots.
Good luck with the build.





"Our watchword evermore shall be: The Maple Leaf Forever!"

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stevec

posted on 18/6/06 at 05:44 PM Reply With Quote
Warm British beer. Thats what you want. With names like Speckled Hen and Dogs Bo**ocks and Bishops Finger.Etc.

[Edited on 18/6/06 by stevec]

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joneh

posted on 18/6/06 at 06:40 PM Reply With Quote
American beer is a lot like sex on the beach : fu@£ing near water






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the JoKeR

posted on 18/6/06 at 07:08 PM Reply With Quote
Honestly, the only reason I even have Miller in the house is because it's very good in beer bread. Back when I used to drink beer it would have been Sierra Nevada Pale Ale, Guinness, a good dopple bock, or a home brew. As said, Miller is a good bribe to get people to help, but not good enough for them to want to stay!





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the JoKeR

posted on 19/6/06 at 01:31 AM Reply With Quote
Here the end-of-the-weekend update. The top rails are all in place now, giving me a chance to do a first "test drive" and to fit the Canadian Locost nosecone. The "chin" on the nosecone will do a nice job in hiding the lower framework. I still have yet to cut and tackweld in the side pieces of the nose framework. They're next on the list to do.








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C10CoryM

posted on 19/6/06 at 05:31 AM Reply With Quote
Thats the COLD nose cone? What do you think of it so far?





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the JoKeR

posted on 19/6/06 at 11:17 AM Reply With Quote
Maybe I'm just expecting thicker fiberglass, but it seems kind of thin to me. It's even all the way around, so I guess that is as thick as they wanted it to be. I'm also used to working with heavier 'glass doors, so it probably is just me. The outside skin is nice and even and will only need minor work to make it paint-ready. Chris at COLD was good to deal with and delivered right as expected, including forwarding me the UPS tracking number as requested. The packaging was pretty light-duty, but this nosecone is pretty light. I expect they haven't had any isssues that would require them to spend more on packaging. Overall, it's not what I'm used to but is everything I wanted. If I destroy this one someday I'll go back to them for a replacement.





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C10CoryM

posted on 19/6/06 at 04:25 PM Reply With Quote
Good to know. I guess on a sub 1500lb car there is no need for more layers .
Im close enough to COLD to drive over there myself but Im not experienced in fibreglass. Done a little carbon/kevlar stuff but not much.
Cheers.





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leto

posted on 19/6/06 at 05:28 PM Reply With Quote
“Low wight equals high performance” GRP is heavy so the less of it there is the better
The first Lotus Seven weight 725lbs (without spare wheel).

[Edited on 06-6-20 by leto]





“I'm gonna ride around in style
I'm gonna drive everybody wild
'Cause I'll have the only one there is a round”. (J. Cash)

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the JoKeR

posted on 25/6/06 at 06:12 PM Reply With Quote
A week later and it's time to test-fit the engine into the body framework. I tried it just as it was removed from the engine first, only to find that the power steering pump and A/C compressor made it too wide to fit.




Off they came and the engine fit with little problem, other than the air pump on the passenger (the right side ) causing a little problem. I'll have to verify that I can remove it without causing me headaches in getting it registered with the state. What really surprised me was how much leg room there will be. I'm 6'3" and there was plenty of length. Not much width though. I'll have to see if I can get the engine over an inch or so to give me room for my feet. In the following pic, I've dropped a couple of boards on the floor to allow me to have a seat.







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Dutchman

posted on 4/7/06 at 12:07 PM Reply With Quote
from 'what' did you use the pedals which car ?





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the JoKeR

posted on 4/7/06 at 12:54 PM Reply With Quote
The pedals are new Wilwood clutch and brake pedals. The brake pedal has an adjusting bar for dual master cylinders which will allow me to adjust my brakes front to rear.





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scotty g

posted on 5/7/06 at 05:14 PM Reply With Quote
I can tell that nose is from Canada, its got a built in snow plough on the bottom
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the JoKeR

posted on 5/7/06 at 11:44 PM Reply With Quote
Let's hope we never find out if it works!

I've moved along in the build and have the rear axle in place to make sure everything will line up. Since it does, I've started ordering the rod ends and tube so I can make the actual parts. I'm also test fitting the shocks. No idea yet if they'll actually work or not, as I don't know the spring rates, etc., but for the price couldn't pass 'em up!




I also took the drums off the axle and found I've got to replace the seals. The passenger side was leaking long enough that it looks like a grease buildup around the brake shoes! No wonder the rear brakes have lasted the previous owner so long. Since brakes are a somewhat important thing to have I'm just going to replace everything and be done with it. New seals, new brake drums, new shoes, new springs, new brake cylinders, new gear oil, new cover gasket, etc. Might as well be done with it for good.







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kb58

posted on 6/7/06 at 12:36 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by the JoKeR
I'm also test fitting the shocks. No idea yet if they'll actually work or not, as I don't know the spring rates, etc.,


Sure you do... place the shock on the garage floor standing up. Place a known weight on the top and measure the displacement. Spring rate = pounds applied / displacement





Mid-engine Locost - http://www.midlana.com
And the book - http://www.lulu.com/shop/kurt-bilinski/midlana/paperback/product-21330662.html
Kimini - a tube-frame, carbon shell, Honda Prelude VTEC mid-engine Mini: http://www.kimini.com
And its book - http://www.lulu.com/shop/kurt-bilinski/kimini-how-to-design-and-build-a-mid-engine-sports-car-from-scratch/paperback/product-4858803.html

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the JoKeR

posted on 6/7/06 at 02:06 AM Reply With Quote
Well, I don't know the rates yet, as I haven't done that yet.





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the JoKeR

posted on 16/7/06 at 10:27 PM Reply With Quote
The 4-link suspension and panhard bars are now under construction. For them I picked up some 7/8" OD DOM tube with .188" wall thickness. I then drilled out the 1/2" ID to 37/64", which is the recommended size for tapping 5/8-18 threads. One side was tapped for left hand threads and the other for right hand threads. With the ends screwed in place (locknuts are yet to be added) all I need to do to adjust the bar length is to twist the bar and then lock down the locknuts. At this time, the panhard bar is half done. I need to make the brackets for the chassis and the axle so I can make sure it's the right length before I cut the bar. Hopefully that'll be done in the next few days and I can then turn my attention to the front suspension and also to finishing the axle. I think the bar OD is a little thicker than I really need, but I'm paying a very small weight penalty having it this thick and I'm more confident it will never be my "weak link".








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kb58

posted on 16/7/06 at 10:31 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by the JoKeR
I think the bar OD is a little thicker than I really need, but I'm paying a very small weight penalty having it this thick and I'm more confident it will never be my "weak link".


Once you calculate the forces in the tubes, multiply by your safety factor X, you can find the needed tube size in a strength-of-materials book. You can save some weight, at the expense of complexity, by using larger tubing with thinner walls, then welding in threaded adaptors. Strength of tubing comes from the outside diameter, and much less so from the wall thickness. Without looking it up, it's very likely 1" OD tubing with a 0.063" wall is as strong as the smaller heavier tubing.

Then again I completely understand why you did it the way you did.

[Edited on 7/16/06 by kb58]





Mid-engine Locost - http://www.midlana.com
And the book - http://www.lulu.com/shop/kurt-bilinski/midlana/paperback/product-21330662.html
Kimini - a tube-frame, carbon shell, Honda Prelude VTEC mid-engine Mini: http://www.kimini.com
And its book - http://www.lulu.com/shop/kurt-bilinski/kimini-how-to-design-and-build-a-mid-engine-sports-car-from-scratch/paperback/product-4858803.html

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the JoKeR

posted on 17/7/06 at 11:28 AM Reply With Quote
Yeah, this tube was "in stock" and I knew it would work with minimal hastle!





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